Australia

Harvest – Brisbane – Australia

Alexander COOSEMANS - Flanders 1627-1689 - Still life c.1650 - Oil on canvas - 58.2 x 83.5cm Bequest of The Hon. Thomas Lodge Murray Prior, MLC 1892 Collection: Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art

Alexander COOSEMANS – Flanders 1627-1689 – Still life c.1650 – Oil on canvas – 58.2 x 83.5cm
Bequest of The Hon. Thomas Lodge Murray Prior, MLC 1892
Collection: Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art


From june 28 to september 21 2014 – Queensland Art Gallery –  GOMA

‘Harvest’ explores the production, consumption and symbolism of food. It takes as a point of departure colonial legacies and globalisation, labour and consumption in relation to the food industry. The exhibition will include over 100 works from all areas of the Gallery’s Collection, and will be presented in conjunction with the Australian Cinémathèque program ‘Harvest: Food on Film’.

The exhibition draw on the Gallery’s historical and contemporary collections to consider the social, political and aesthetic implications of food production, distribution and consumption.

‘Food has long given sustenance to the artistic imagination – from the exotic foods and spices pictured in seventeenth-century northern European still-life paintings to contemporary artists’ renderings of global brands,’

‘On entering the Gallery audiences will encounter a major new wallpaper commission from California-based artist duo Fallen Fruit (David Burns and Austin Young) whose public projects and site-specific installations work with fruit as a motif or material.

The relationship between food and art has never been so richly illustrated or explored than it will be in this exhibition. For food and art lovers alike, ‘Harvest’ explores the Gallery’s Collection in a very different light.’

‘In those 100 works are include the new acquisitions such as Mika Rottenberg’s video installation Mary’s cherries 2004, a fantastical comment on the absurdity of modern means of production and Yael Bartana’s photographs recreating imagined ‘lost’ images by Jewish-German photographers Leni and Herbert Sonnenfeld,’

Shirana Shahbazi, Iran/Switzerland b.1974; Sirous Shaghaghi, Iran / Still life: Coconut and other things 2009 / Synthetic polymer paint on canvas / Gift of the artist through the Queensland Art Gallery Foundation 2010 / Commissioned as part of a workshop for Kids’ APT6 / Collection: Queensland Art Gallery / © The artist

Shirana Shahbazi, Iran/Switzerland b.1974; Sirous Shaghaghi, Iran / Still life: Coconut and other things 2009 / Synthetic polymer paint on canvas / Gift of the artist through the Queensland Art Gallery Foundation 2010 / Commissioned as part of a workshop for Kids’ APT6 / Collection: Queensland Art Gallery / © The artist

Xu Zhen’s ShangART Supermarket 2008 recreates a fully stocked convenience store in the gallery space, while Aernout Mik’s video Pulverous 2003 shows a group of people fastidiously, often violently, demolishing the contents of a different kind of supermarket.

Also featured will be Rirkrit Tirvanija’s Untitled (lunch box) 2009, a fortnightly Thai lunch that four random Gallery visitors can sample, and Danish trio Superflex’s video documenting the inundation of a replica fast food restaurant in Flooded McDonald’s 2009.

Contemporary works by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists included in the show trace ongoing connections between food, country, and cultural knowledge, such as Evelyn McGreen’s spirit basket linocuts and Emily Kame Kngwarreye’s yam dreaming paintings.

Queensland Art Gallery


Still life – Sydney – Australia

John Passmore Poppies, fruit and skull 1953

John Passmore Poppies, fruit and skull 1953


Until 19 Jan 2014 – Art Gallery of New South Wales

Featuring some of Australia’s most famous and popular artists, this exhibition of 25 works from the Gallery’s collection charts the continuous development of the still life in Australian art.

It includes significant paintings by Margaret Preston, Margaret Olley, George W Lambert and Arthur Streeton, some of which have not been exhibited for decades. These are displayed alongside a large-scale sculpture by Ricky Swallow titled Killing time 2003-04.

A changing selection of works on paper focuses initially on watercolour, including works by Elisabeth Cummings, Kevin Lincoln, Brian Dunlop, Peter Godwin and John Bokor. In late October these will be refreshed by prints and drawings by Peter Booth, John Brack, Cressida Campbell and others.

Art Gallery of New South Wales


Australian Impressionists in France – Melbourne – Australia

John RUSSELL Peonies and head of a woman (c. 1887)  oil on canvas - 40.7 x 65.0 cm National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne The Joseph Brown Collection. Presented through the NGV Foundation by Dr Joseph Brown AO OBE, Honorary Life Benefactor, 2004 2004.218

John RUSSELL
Peonies and head of a woman (c. 1887)
oil on canvas – 40.7 x 65.0 cm
National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne
The Joseph Brown Collection. Presented through the NGV Foundation by Dr Joseph Brown AO OBE, Honorary Life Benefactor, 2004 2004.218


15 Jun 2013 to 06 Oct 2013 – National Gallery of Victoria

For the first time, the story of the Australian artists who lived in France during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries is presented in an exhibition of over 130 stunning works of art. Australian Impressionists in France challenges our understanding of Australian art during these revolutionary decades.

Beginning in the 1880s and continuing into the twentieth century, many of the best and brightest art students left Australia to continue their studies in Paris, the undisputed world capital of the arts. In France the Australians became part of the large community of French and foreign artists who were changing the course of art.

Charles Conder England 1868–1909, lived in Australia 1884–90, Europe 1890–1905 Mrs Conder in pink c.1901- oil on canvas - 48.0 x 44.3 cm New Walk Museum and Art Gallery, Leicester Purchased by the Friends of the Museum, 1956 (L.F43.1956) © Leicester Arts & Museums/The Bridgeman Art Library

Charles Conder
England 1868–1909, lived in Australia 1884–90, Europe 1890–1905
Mrs Conder in pink c.1901- oil on canvas – 48.0 x 44.3 cm
New Walk Museum and Art Gallery, Leicester
Purchased by the Friends of the Museum, 1956 (L.F43.1956)
© Leicester Arts & Museums/The Bridgeman Art Library

Claude Monet demonstrated his Impressionist technique to John Russell; Charles Conder trawled the cabarets of Montmartre with Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec; and Vincent van Gogh considered Russell a friend. In France, Australian artists engaged in personal and artistic exchanges with artists from around the world.

The exhibition shows that during these years Australian art took place beyond the confines of Australia, and examines how the expatriate artists were part of the story of Impressionism in Australia. Through the inclusion of key works by French, British and American artists the exhibition also places the Australians’ work within an international context of Impressionist art.

Australian Impressionists in France brings together over 130 paintings, prints and drawings from major public and private collections around the world. It includes important paintings by John Russell, E.Phillips Fox and Charles Conder, as well as never before seen works by lesser-known artists.

National Gallery of Victoria


Contemporary Australia: Women – Brisbane – Australia

Deborah Kelly | Australia b.1962 | Beastliness (still) 2011 | Animation: 3:17 minutes, colour, sound, 16:9, ed. 2/8 | Purchased 2011. Queensland Art Gallery Foundation | Collection: Queensland Art Gallery | © Deborah Kelly. Licensed by Viscopy, Sydney, 2012


Until 22 July 2012 – Gallery of Modern Art

‘Contemporary Australia: Women’ — the second in the Gallery’s Contemporary Australia exhibition series — celebrates the diversity, energy and innovation of contemporary women artists working in this country today.

Deborah Kelly | Australia b.1962 | Beastliness (still) 2011


Th
is exhibition acknowledges the strong history of work by women artists and recognises the ways that their critical, provocative, unexpected and illuminating contributions have reshaped, and continue to shape, the landscape of contemporary art. It features more than 70 new and recent works, including painting, sculpture, photography, installation, textiles, video and performance by 33 artists and collectives, a total of 56 visual artists.

Jennifer Mills | What’s in a name? (detail), 2009–11 | Mixed media on paper 323 drawings, varying dimensions Installed dimensions variable Purchased 2011. Queensland Art Gallery Foundation Collection: Queensland Art Gallery Photograph: Natasha Harth


Th
e exhibition also includes Embodied Acts, a program of performative works; the Children’s Art Centre installation art work ‘Fly Away Home’ by Fiona Hall; and a film program curated by renowned Australian producer and critic Margaret Pomeranz, AM.

GOMA


Modern Woman: Daughters and Lovers 1850 — 1918 – Brisbane – Australia

 

Edgar Degas | Danseuse assise, penchée en avant, elle se masse le pied gauche (Dancer sitting, leaning forward, she massages her left foot) 1881–83 | Caillebotte legacy in Luxembourg, 1894 | Collection: Musée d’Orsay, Paris | Photograph: © Hervé Lewandowski | © RMN (RF22712)/Musée d’Orsay


Until June 24, 2012 – Queensland Art Gallery (QAG)

‘Modern Woman: Daughters and Lovers 1850 — 1918 | Drawings from the Musée d’Orsay, Paris’, an exhibition of drawings from the Musée d’Orsay, Paris.

Eugène Boudin | France 1824–98 | La Dame en bleu (Woman in blue)1860–70 | Beige paper, pencil, watercolour | Bequest of Carle Dreyfus, 1953 | RF 29980, Recto | Collection: Musée d’Orsay, Paris | Photograph: © RMN (Musée d’Orsay) / Jean Schormans


I
t celebrates the changing roles of women during the Belle Époque as depicted by leading artists of the time such as Edgar Degas, Pierre—Auguste Renoir, Edouard Vuillard, Edouard Manet, Camille Pissarro, Pierre Bonnard, Auguste Rodin, Berthe Morisot and Jean François Millet. These artists increasingly abandoned idealised representations of the female figure, and turned to women from a diverse range of socioeconomic backgrounds, depicting them in their family lives and domestic activities, as well as in the public realm as spectators, performers and workers. Through these fascinating drawings, we see French society undergoing radical transformation.

Gallery Hours


Craig Handley: mis-cel-la-ne-ous – Sydney Australia

Craig Handley - who'sthatcrankybastard - oil on canvas - 66 x 76 cm


10 March – 28 March – Gallery Richard Martin

Craig Handley’s work has already found its way into private collections around Australia as well as overseas to Hong Kong, New York, Scotland and Singapore.

Craig Handley- incoming - oil on canvas - 76 x 92 cm


“I
like … enigmatic and mysterious subject matter; the frozen, unreal atmosphere of a stage or film set; to deliberately juxtapose elements to aim for uneasy mood; to create a slightly unsettling feeling of the familiar but yet unknown.
My work is a medley, a collage of all the things I come across while travelling about. They are rearrangements, a hodgepodge of places and objects and light. Painting for me is also about introspection, an attempt to make sense of all the imagery of my mind and cobble it together into a painting; I like to delve into my personal history, both the emotional and the visual. My early training as a sign writer ingrains a tight control that is hard to shake. The years spent telling stories visually in animation give my work that ‘here is the camera’ sort of feel.”

Gallery Hours


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