France

Niki de Saint Phalle – Paris – France

Cheval et la Mariée, 1963, 235 x 300 x 120 cm, tissu, jouets, objets divers, grillage, Sprengel Museum, Hanovre, © BPK, Berlin, dist. Rmn-Grand Palais / Michael Herling / Aline Gwose

Cheval et la Mariée, 1963, 235 x 300 x 120 cm, tissu, jouets, objets divers, grillage, Sprengel Museum, Hanovre, © BPK, Berlin, dist. Rmn-Grand Palais / Michael Herling / Aline Gwose


From September 17, 2014 to February 2, 2015 – Grand Palais

Niki de Saint Phalle (1930 – 2002) is one of the most renowned artists from the mid-twentieth century. Throughout her prolific career, Saint Phalle created a complex body of work in various media which was deeply embedded with socio-political issues. With themes ranging from joyful to profound to intellectual, the paradoxal nature of her work has yet to be fully explored. She was one of the first women to receive international acclaim and recognition during her lifetime, as well as successfully create a public persona. Similar to Warhol, Saint Phalle was able to use the media to skillfully guide the reception of her work

Cheval et la Mariée, 1963, 235 x 300 x 120 cm, tissu, jouets, objets divers, grillage, Sprengel Museum, Hanovre, © BPK, Berlin, dist. Rmn-Grand Palais / Michael Herling / Aline Gwose

Cheval et la Mariée, 1963, 235 x 300 x 120 cm, tissu, jouets, objets divers, grillage, Sprengel Museum, Hanovre, © BPK, Berlin, dist. Rmn-Grand Palais / Michael Herling / Aline Gwose


W
ithout any formal art training, Niki de Saint Phalle took her inspiration from Gaudi, Dubuffet and Pollock to invent, in the late 1950s, a singular world independent of any trend or art movement. Her entire career is sublimated by great themes and myths, which later articulated her entire oeuvre. The joyous, colourful side of her work is well known but its violence, commitment and radical stands have been forgotten. And this is equally true of her audacious performances, the political and feminist content of her work and her ambitious public sculptures.

Dolorès, 1968-1995, 550 cm, polyester peint sur grillage, Sprengel Museum, Hanovre,© 2014 Niki Charitable Art Foundation, All rights reserved. Donation Niki de Saint Phalle -

Dolorès, 1968-1995, 550 cm, polyester peint sur grillage, Sprengel Museum, Hanovre,© 2014 Niki Charitable Art Foundation, All rights reserved. Donation Niki de Saint Phalle -


T
his retrospective, the first major exhibition devoted to Niki de Saint Phalle in twenty years, presents a multifaceted artist, at once a painter, assembly artist, sculptor, printmaker, performer and experimental filmmaker, and takes a profoundly new look at her work. Over 200 works and archives, many unpublished, are set out in 2,000 square metres, organised by chronology and theme, and punctuated by screens showing the artist talking about her work. Models of architectural projects and a sculpture-fountain (Snake’s Tree) outside the Grand Palais will give visitors an idea of the scope and diversity of her public work

Musee du Grand Palais


Robert Mapplethorpe – Paris – France

Robert Mapplethorpe (American, 1946-1989). Self-Portrait, 1988. Gelatin silver print. Sheet: 24 x 20 in. (61 x 50.8 cm). Frame: 33 x 28 in. (83.8 x 71.1 cm). The Estate of Robert Mapplethorpe, New York City.

Robert Mapplethorpe (American, 1946-1989). Self-Portrait, 1988. Gelatin silver print. Sheet: 24 x 20 in. (61 x 50.8 cm). Frame: 33 x 28 in. (83.8 x 71.1 cm). The Estate of Robert Mapplethorpe, New York City.


26 March 2014 to 13 July 2014 – Grand Palais, Galerie sud-est

Robert Mapplethorpe was one of the great masters of art photography. He produced highly stylised black and white portraits, nudes and still lifes. Over and above the erotic power that made Mapplethorpe’s work famous, the exhibition presents the classic dimension of the artist’s work and his search for aesthetic perfection, through over 200 images that span his career from the early 1970s to his untimely death in 1989.

Robert Mapplethorpe, Self Portrait 1980 - © Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation

Robert Mapplethorpe, Self Portrait 1980 – © Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation

Grand Palais


Frida Kahlo – Diego Rivera – L’art en fusion – Paris – France

Frida Kahlo (1907-1954) - Autorretrato con Traje de Terciopelo 1926 - Collection privée - © Photo Francisco Kochen - © ADAGP, Paris 2013

Frida Kahlo (1907-1954) – Autorretrato con Traje de Terciopelo 1926 – Collection privée – © Photo Francisco Kochen – © ADAGP, Paris 2013


Until January 13th, 2014 – Musée de L’Orangerie

She is the myth no one can ignore: an artist who goes beyond her atrocious physical pains and imposes her femininity in a country where man is king. Her lover and then husband, mural artist Diego Rivera, was for a longtime the best known of the two. But today, Frida Kahlo is the real icon. The musée de l’Orangerie places her today face to face with her half Diego but she is the real star of this contained exhibition : some fifty oil paintings on canvas, masonite, aluminum, etc., aside from the drawings and photographs, most of them on loan from the Dolores Olmedo collection, one of the main collectors of the two artists.

Diego Rivera (Mexican, 1886 – 1957), Autorretrato Con Chambergo, 1907, oil on canvas, Museo Dolores Olmedo. © 2012 Banco de México Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Museums Trust, Mexico, D. F. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Diego Rivera (Mexican, 1886 – 1957), Autorretrato Con Chambergo, 1907, oil on canvas, Museo Dolores Olmedo. © 2012 Banco de México Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Museums Trust, Mexico, D. F. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

While Kahlo’s style veers toward the flattened surrealism of Mexican folklore, Rivera engages in an artistic conversation with the burgeoning European movements of the time, toying with trends like Cubism and abstraction. Yet while their styles diverge, both 20th century artists were deeply rooted in the history and culture of Mexico, and have forever marked the country’s artistic tradition.

Frida Kahlo - Self Portrait with Small Monkey

Frida Kahlo – Self Portrait with Small Monkey

The colors of Mexico explode in each of her still lives, whether with corn, manioc, prickly pears or arums, in her poisonous vegetations, or in her portraits of Indian women from the South (the famous mothers from the isthmus of Tehuantepec). She has a rage for living that can be seen in the little room d edicated to Frida’s “self-portraits of suffering”, in which she draws herself bedridden and mutilated. One can be indifferent to her art but her energy fascinates us all …

Musée de L’Orangerie


The Springtime of the Renaissance – Paris – France

Donatello (Donato di Niccolò di Betto Bardi; Florence vers 1386-1466). Buste reliquaire de San Rossore, vers 1424- 1427, bronze fondu ciselé, doré et argenté. Pise, musée national de San Matteo, inv. 1720 © Scala, Florence.

Donatello (Donato di Niccolò di Betto Bardi; Florence vers 1386-1466). Buste reliquaire de San Rossore, vers 1424-
1427, bronze fondu ciselé, doré et argenté. Pise, musée national de San Matteo, inv. 1720 © Scala, Florence.


From September 26, 2013 to January 6, 2014 – Le Louvre museum

The Springtime of the Renaissance deals with the genesis of this major artistic and cultural movement, which first arose in Florence in the early years of the 15th century.

Sculpture, an essential aspect of this rebirth, is the central focus of this exhibition. Some 140 works are presented, including several monumental ones, grouped into ten thematic sections. In addition to sculptures, the exhibition also features paintings, drawings, manuscripts, silver and gold pieces and tin-glazed earthenware.

Donatello (Donato di Niccolò di Betto Bardi; Florentine, c. 1386–1466). Spiritelli from the Cantoria (Choir Loft) in the Duomo, 1439. Bronze with traces of gilding; marble bases (not originally part of the sculpture). Institut de France, Musée Jacquemart-André, Paris.

Donatello (Donato di Niccolò di Betto Bardi; Florentine, c. 1386–1466). Spiritelli from the Cantoria (Choir Loft) in the Duomo, 1439. Bronze with traces of gilding; marble bases (not originally part of the sculpture). Institut de France, Musée Jacquemart-André, Paris.


S
culptures by Donatello serve as one of the threads running through the exhibition, which presents several of the greatest masterpieces by this artist, considered by many as the most creative exponent of the Renaissance. However his works do not in any way eclipse the virtuosity of contributions by other illustrious sculptors, including Ghiberti, Michelozzo, Desiderio da Settignano and Mino da Fiesole.

Filippo Brunelleschi (Florentine, 1377–1446) or Nanni di Banco (Florentine, active c. 1405–1421). Madonna and Child (Fiesole Madonna), c. 1405–10. Polychromed and gilt terra-cotta. Diocesi di Fiesole, Fiesole, on loan to the Museo Bandini.

Filippo Brunelleschi (Florentine, 1377–1446) or Nanni di Banco (Florentine, active c. 1405–1421). Madonna and
Child (Fiesole Madonna), c. 1405–10. Polychromed and gilt terra-cotta. Diocesi di Fiesole, Fiesole, on loan to the Museo Bandini.


T
he ten sections of the exhibition form a coherent whole, placing emphasis in some cases on themes and styles, and in others on the social and cultural context serving as the unifying frame joining together the works on display.
The major influence of Greek and Roman antiquity is constantly present throughout all of the sections, showing how important works of antiquity had a key impact on artistic creation during this period. The panoply of rich and varied approaches on view, all intimately linked, help unveil the mysteries behind the flowering of the Florentine Renaissance.
Several of the works have been returned to their former glory after a vast two-year restoration campaign led jointly by the Fondazione Palazzo Strozzi and the Louvre, allowing visitors to fully appreciate masterpieces such as Donatello’s imposing gilt bronze statue of Saint Louis of Anjou (also known as Saint Louis of Toulouse, 1425) from the Museo dell’Opera di Santa Croce.

It was for the city’s major public buildings, including the Duomo, the Campanile, and Orsanmichele, that artists such as Donatello, Ghiberti, Nanni di Banco and Michelozzo would create their finest masterpieces.
These monumental public sculptures eloquently bear witness to the fundamental stylistic transformations at work during the Florentine Renaissance, creating a new artistic language while helping to convey the supreme heights reached by Florentine civilization.
Major themes from classical antiquity, as interpreted in particular by Donatello, were gradually assimilated and transformed to create the new artistic language of the Renaissance.
Sculptors of the Florentine Renaissance also sought to emulate the great equestrian monuments of antiquity, which decorated public places to celebrate military virtue.

Donatello (Donato di Niccolò di Betto Bardi; Florentine, c. 1386–1466). Horse’s Head, known as the Protome Carafa, c. 1455. Bronze. Museo Archeologico Nazionale, Naples.

Donatello (Donato di Niccolò di Betto Bardi; Florentine, c. 1386–1466). Horse’s Head, known as the Protome Carafa, c. 1455. Bronze. Museo Archeologico Nazionale, Naples.


T
he invention of linear perspective by Brunelleschi and the quest for a rational, mathematical ordering of space are explored in the “History in Perspective” section. Without a doubt, the resulting experiments found their most creative expression in sculpture, here juxtaposed with painted works. Brought to great heights first and foremost in Donatello’s basreliefs, this quest notably produced such works as the predella depicting Saint George and the Dragon (Museo Nazionale del Bargello), a supreme Renaissance masterpiece, combining linear and atmospheric perspective to achieve an open, rational and infinite space.

Desiderio da Settignano (Settignano c. 1429–Florence 1464). Marietta Strozzi, c. 1464. Marble. Skulpturensammlung und Museum für Byzantinische Kunst, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Bode-Museum, Berlin.

Desiderio da Settignano (Settignano c. 1429–Florence 1464). Marietta Strozzi, c. 1464. Marble. Skulpturensammlung und Museum für Byzantinische Kunst, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Bode-Museum, Berlin.


T
he civic aspect of artistic production in Florence eventually gave way to more prevalent private patronage, which began to play a decisive role with the advent of the wealthy Cosimo de’ Medici, founder of the political dynasty that would rule Florence from 1434 to 1537. This period thus saw the transition from Florentine sovereignty and selfsufficiency, or libertas, symbolized by public commissions, to a private patronage already colored by the burgeoning hegemony of the Medicis. This ostentatious bent would find one of its most forceful expressions in the fashion for private bust portraits, a new genre that arose at mid-century.

Musee du Louvre


Georges Braque – Paris – France

Georges Braque, L’oiseau noir et l’oiseau blanc,1960, Huile sur toile, 134 x 167,5 cm

Georges Braque, L’oiseau noir et l’oiseau blanc,1960, Huile sur toile, 134 x 167,5 cm

18 September 2013 to 06 January 2014 – Grand Palais
This retrospective, dedicated to the major 20th century artist Georges Braque, will survey all the periods of his artistic creation, from Fauvism to his final works culminating in the magnificent art studios and birds series. The exhibition will focus on highlights in his career, such as Cubism, the Canéphores (Basket Carriers) of the 1920’s, and his final landscapes.

Georges Braque (1882-1963) is one of the major artists of the twentieth century. Painter and sculptor, he was first as the initiator of cubism and inventor of collages, a leading figure of the avant-garde of the early century before finally focus his work on the systematic exploration and serial still life and landscape that make him the French painter par excellence, heir of Corot and Chardin and custodian of the classical tradition but also the precursor of postwar abstraction.

Le Grand Palais


Roy Lichtenstein – Paris – France

 Lichtenstein, Oh, Jeff…I Love You, Too…But… (1964), Collection Simonyi © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein/DACS 2012

Lichtenstein, Oh, Jeff…I Love You, Too…But… (1964), Collection Simonyi © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein/DACS 2012


From July 3 to November 4, 2013 – Centre Pompidou

We saw it in London, but now the exhibition has finally reached France. The retrospective on Roy Lichtenstein (1923-1997) will undoubtedly be one of the Summer’s blockbusters, given the artist’s reputation, he who was the first to merge painting and comic strips, to transcend the framework of contemporary art.

Roy Lichtenstein - dyptich - Step on can with paint pop-art painting

Roy Lichtenstein – Step-on Can with Leg, 1961 – Oil on canvas, diptych – 2 panels; 32 1/2 x 26 1/2 inches each


“W
hat can you paint that’s not completely ridiculous?” he exclaimed as early as 1972, before bursting out laughing, in the middle of a serious interview about the series of still life paintings he was in the midst of producing. Still lifes inspired by the works of great modern masters. Matisse, Picasso, Léger, Le Corbusier, etc. are referenced or evoked in a title which mentions, if not their name, then the appropriate movement: Cubism for some, Purism for others. In 1972, at the age of 49, Lichtenstein had already been identified as one of the leading lights of the pop art movement for ten years, even though he was unveiling a series of paintings whose references to art history would make him one of the first “postmodern” artists.

Roy Lichtenstein - Still life after picasso - 1964

Roy Lichtenstein – Still life after picasso – 1964


T
he Centre Pompidou today presents a retrospective of his work, featuring a selection of 124 paintings, sculptures and prints that shed an original light on his career. The exhibition reveals the often surprising depth of an artist who was, from the beginning, more than just a pop painter. He was an experimenter of materials, an inventor of icons and an educated connoisseur of modern painting.

Roy Lichtenstein - Sculpture - woman head with blue shadow

Roy Lichtenstein – Sculpture – woman head with blue shadow


A
s the fourth stop of this exhibition event organised by the Centre Pompidou, in collaboration with the Art Institute of Chicago and the Tate in London, (and also shown in Washington), the Parisian retrospective shows the incredible technical inventiveness of Roy Lichtenstein through a body of original sculptures, prints, enamels and ceramics.

Roy Lichtenstein - Ohhh….Alright 1964

Roy Lichtenstein – Ohhh….Alright 1964

Roy Lichtenstein - Whaam! 1963 - Acrylic and oil on canvas - 1727 x 4064 mm - Purchased 1966© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein – Whaam! 1963 – Acrylic and oil on canvas – 1727 x 4064 mm – Purchased 1966© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein


T
hese experimentations, a little known aspect of his work, demonstrate the research he undertook throughout his career. This exhibition has enjoyed exceptional support from the Estate of Roy Lichtenstein in New York.

Centre Pompidou


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