Italy

American artist Romaine Brooks and the roaring twenties – Venice – Italy

Romaine Brooks, “Autoritratto”

Romaine Brooks, “Autoritratto”

Until March 13, 2016 – Venice, Palazzo Fortuny

Beatrice Romaine Goddard was one of the most representative figures of the artistic scene of the 1920s
Paintings, drawings, photographs _ With this exhibition, the first ever in Italy to be dedicated to the American artist Romaine Brooks, we discover the non-conformist, refined and cosmopolitan community that animated the most sophisticated cultural circles of the Belle Époque in Paris, Capri and Venice: Jean Cocteau, Paul Morand, Luisa Casati, Ida Rubinstein and Gabriele d’Annunzio are just some of the characters who were privileged to be immortalised by the artist, famous for her palette of moonlight tones.

Gabriele d'Annunzio

Romaine Brooks, “Gabriele d’Annunzio, il poeta in esilio”, 1912, Olio su tela, 116×95 cm, Paris, Centre Pompidou

Curated by Jérôme Merceron on the basis of a project by Daniela Ferretti, the exhibition arises from the felicitous meeting with Lucile Audouy, a passionate and feisty collector in Paris, who has generously loaned a very important group of works for the exhibition in Venice, many of which never before seen in public.

Romaine Brooks, “La marchesa Casati”, 1920 circa, Olio su tela, 248 x 120 cm, Collezione Lucile Audouy © Photo Thomas Hennocque

Romaine Brooks, “La marchesa Casati”, 1920 circa, Olio su tela, 248 x 120 cm, Collezione Lucile Audouy © Photo Thomas Hennocque

Born in Rome in 1874 to American parents and married to pianist John Ellington Brooks, Beatrice Romaine Goddard was one of the most interesting figures of the artistic scene of the Twenties. Romantically linked to the writer Nathalie Clifford Barney and, simultaneously, to the dancer Ida Rubinstein – her model for many paintings -– the American artist also had an intense relationship with d’Annunzio, whom she immortalised in two famous portraits. Initially influenced by the painting of Whistler, she soon found her unmistakable signature style, one marked by an infinite variety of greys and old pinks and an uncanny ability to capture the soul of her subjects.

However, it is the drawings that are the deepest mirror of her tragic and lonely soul. Charged with a suffering poetry, emotion and mystery, irony and pessimism, these elements blend in the taut line devoid of any decorative frills that almost cuts into the paper without hesitation or second thoughts; they accompany us with modesty and apparent detachment through the meanders of an inner world, constantly poised between light and darkness.

Palazzo Fortuny


Picasso and Spanish Modernity – Florence – Italy

Pablo Picasso (Malaga 1881–Mougins 1973) Portrait of Dora Maar 27 March 1939, oil on panel, 60 x 45 cm. Collection of the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía,Madrid, DE01840

Pablo Picasso (Malaga 1881–Mougins 1973) Portrait of Dora Maar 27
March 1939, oil on panel, 60 x 45 cm.
Collection of the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía,Madrid, DE01840


From 20 September 2014 to 25 January 2015 – La Mostra – Fondazione Palazzo Strozzi

The exhibition explores the major themes developed throughout the career of a painter who had the greatest impact on the history of the 20th century: art reflecting on art and on the relationship between the real and the super-real* and between nature and culture, the artist’s heartfelt involvement in the tragedy of unfolding history, the emergence of the monster with a human face, and the metaphor of erotic desire as a primary source of inspiration for the artist’s creativity and world vision.The exhibition also allows visitors to explore Picasso’s multi-faceted personality, the almost symbiotic bond that existed between his art and his life, between the work that he created and the time of his life in which he created it, while History with a capital “H” frequently made powerful inroads both into his pictures and into his life.

Juan Gris (Madrid 1887–Boulogne-Billancourt1927) Harlequin with Violin 1919, oil on canvas, 91.7 x 73 cm. Collection of the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid, DE01560

Juan Gris (Madrid 1887–Boulogne-Billancourt1927) Harlequin with Violin
1919, oil on canvas, 91.7 x 73 cm.
Collection of the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid, DE01560


P
icasso and Spanish Modernity comprises some ninety works by Picasso and other artists, ranging from painting to sculpture, drawing, engraving and even a film by José Val del Omar, thanks to the Fondazione Palazzo Strozzi’s synergistic cooperation with the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía in Madrid. The works of art on display include such celebrated masterpieces as Woman’s Head
(1910), Portrait of Dora Maar(1939) and The Painter and the Model (1963) by Picasso, Siurana, the Path(1917) and Figure and Bird in the Night (1945) by Miró and Dalí’s Arlequin (1927), along with Picasso’s drawings, engravings and preparatory paintings for his hugemasterpiece Guernica (1937), none of which have been displayed outside Spain in such vast numbers before now.

Fondazione Palazzo Strozzi


Zurbarán – Ferrara – Italy

Zurbaran - The Vision of Saint Peter Nolasco -1629 - Oil on canvas, cm 179 x 223 - Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado

Zurbaran – The Vision of Saint Peter Nolasco -1629 – Oil on canvas, cm 179 x 223 – Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado


14 September 2013 to 6 January 2014 – Ferrara, Palazzo dei Diamanti

This exhibition dedicated to Zurbarán (1598 – 1664) is an opportunity to admire for the first time in Italy the masterpieces of one of the greatest interpreters of Baroque and religious counter-reformation art.

Zurbaran - XII Benjamin - Oil on canvas, cm 198 x 102 (c. 1640-45, Private collection)

Zurbaran – XII Benjamin – Oil on canvas, cm 198 x 102 (c. 1640-45, Private collection)


R
igorously selected works coming from museums and private collections in Europe and America retrace the key stages in Zurbarán career. Beginning with the early works with which the artist established his reputation in Seville (which was one of the centres of art in Spain, as was Florence in Italy), such as The Vision of St Peter Nolasco (1629, Madrid, Museo del Prado) or the later St Francis of Assisi in his tomb (1630-34, Milwaukee Art Museum), with their dramatic luminosity and contrasts inspired by the solemn works of Caravaggio and Ribera, to the sober lyricism of his later works dating from his Madrid period and his contact with Velázquez. In these, a lighter atmosphere prevails, and glimpses of cheerful landscapes and domestic details are revealed, as in the Immaculate Conception with St Joachim and Saint Anne (c. 1638-40, Edinburgh, Scottish National Gallery) or the Virgin and Child with the Infant St John (1662, Bilbao, Museo de Bellas Artes).

Zurbaran - Cup of Water and a Rose - Oil on canvas, cm 21,2 x 30,1(c. 1630, London, The National Gallery)

Zurbaran – Cup of Water and a Rose – Oil on canvas, cm 21,2 x 30,1(c. 1630, London, The National Gallery)


W
hat most advances formal renewal is without doubt the still lifes and depictions of allegorical themes, such as A Cup of Water and a Rose (c. 1630, London, The National Gallery) and Agnus Dei (c. 1634-40, San Diego Museum of Art). The poetic refinement of these paintings, in which the objects are set in a rarefied and silent atmosphere, is left to the simplicity of the composition, to the purity of the forms, and the way he uses the lighting. In these small pictures, as in the many still lifes to be found within various paintings, Zurbarán renders the forms as though purified by the light, in a crystalline vision of great detail and quiet monumentality.

Zurbaran - Saint Casilda - Oil on canvas, cm 171 x 107(c. 1635, Madrid, Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza)

Zurbaran – Saint Casilda – Oil on canvas, cm 171 x 107(c. 1635, Madrid, Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza)


A
mong the artist most original inventions are the great figures of the saints. These sophisticated portraits were immensely popular and were made in series especially for the New World. The sequences reunited in this exhibition include notable works such as Saint Casilda (c. 1635, Madrid, Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza), Benjamin (c. 1640-45, Private collection) and Saint Ursula (Genua, Palazzo Bianco), showing the artist ability to depict sacred episodes with charm and elegance, thanks to the poses, the masterly way the draperies are rendered and the brilliant palette. These majestic figures, turned towards the viewer like protagonist of a portrait, now as then, exercise a magnetic charm.

Palazzo dei Diamanti


Boldini, Previati e De Pisis – Ferrara – Italy

Boldini Woman in Pink oil on cavas - 1916


From October 13th 2012 to January 13th 2013 – Palazzo dei Diamanti

Boldini, Previati e De Pisis. Due secoli di grande arte a Ferrara reunites about eighty works including paintings, sculptures and works on paper that span over one hundred and fifty years of artistic production. The show opens with works from the first half of the 1800s: from paintings by Giovanni Antonio Baruffaldi and Giovanni Pagliarini inspired by the Purismo movement with literary or religious themes to the romantic fervour of those by Girolamo Domenichini, Massimiliano Lodi and Gaetano Turchi that commemorate the grandeur of the Estense heritage or give form to the hopes of the Risorgimento. From the middle of the century, the success of genres such as portrait, panoramic views or landscapes was often linked to artists active outside Ferrara, and above all, to Giovanni Boldini. He was prominent in the renewal of Italian and international painting in the second half of the century, first among the “Macchiaioli” in Florence and then in the Paris of the Impressionists. A wide selection of Boldini’s masterpieces shows his role as an undisputed protagonist in the Belle Époque, as does the establishment in 1935 of the museum dedicated to him. Included are portraits like Portrait of Young Subercaseaux, Firework, Walking in the Bois de Boulogne and Lady in Rose, interior paintings of his atelier, still lifes and panoramic views.

Palazzo dei Diamanti


Good Night State of Body, Mladen Miljanovic – Venice – Italy



From July 7 to August 8, 2012 – A plus A – Centro Espositivo Sloveno

After the New Museum in New York and the Mumok Museum in Vienna, Bosnian artist Mladen Miljanovic comes to Venice for his first Italian solo exhibition Good Night – State of Body at A plus A Slovenian Exhibition Centre. The exhibition will be presented next autumn in Regensburg and New York.

Mladen Miljanovic is one of the most interesting contemporary artists in the East European art scene. He was in fact chosen by Massimiliano Gioni for his triennial Younger than Jesus held at the New Museum in New York in 2009.

After Ibro Hasanovic’s exhibition in November 2011, A plus A continues its exploration of Balkan art with Good Night – State of Body which features two works by Mladen Miljanovic: the film Do You Intend to Lie to Me? and the photographic work Show By Your Hand Where do You Feel Pain. During the opening, the artist will do the performance At the Edge of Margin, in which he will hang his body outside the gallery.


T
he powerful visual impact of Miljanovic’s work goes beyond the cliché of post-war Balkan art and it has had wide international appreciation. The artist takes as a starting point of reflection the reality that surrounds him. He creates original works that can simultaneously be disturbing and touching for their capacity to unravel truths in a very direct, almost brutal, way.

Mladen Miljanovic was born in 1981 in Zenica, an industrial city in Bosnia-Herzegovina, 70 km north from Sarajevo, and graduated from the Academy of Art in Banja Luka. In 2007 he receives the ZVONO price for best Bosnian young artist. Numerous international participations will follow, such as the Busan Biennal in South Korea in 2008, a show at Palazzo Forti in Verona, Italy, in 2009, the Museum Moderner Kunst Stiftung Ludwig Wien (MUMOK) in Wien in 2010 and the 53rd Belgrade October Salon in 2011.

Centro Espositivo Sloveno


Art Return to Art – Firenze – Italia

Louise Bourgeois, Arch of Hysteria, 1993. Courtesy Cheim & Read and Hauser & Wirth. Photo: Allan Finkelman - ©Louise Bourgeois Trust- Louise Bourgeois Trust/VAGA, New York, by SIAE 2012


From May 8 to November 4, 2012 – Galleria dell’Accademia – Firenze

The exhibition Art Returns to art, curated by Bruno Corà, Franca Falletti and Daria Filardo, will see the installation in the rooms of the Galleria dell’Accademia of works by: Francis Bacon, Louise Bourgeois, Alberto Burri, Antonio Catelani, Martin Creed, Gino de Dominicis, Rineke Dijkstra, Marcel Duchamp, Luciano Fabro, Hans Peter Feldmann, Luigi Ghirri, Antony Gormley, Yves Klein, Jannis Kounellis, Ketty La Rocca, Leoncillo, Sol LeWitt, Eliseo Mattiacci, Olaf Nicolai, Luigi Ontani, Giulio Paolini, Claudio Parmiggiani, Giuseppe Penone, Pablo Picasso, Alfredo Pirri, Michelangelo Pistoletto, Renato Ranaldi, Alberto Savinio, Thomas Struth, Fiona Tan, Bill Viola, Andy Warhol.

Louise Bourgeois’s Arch of Hysteria, hung with all its charge of “life’s emotional frenzy” in front of Pontormo’s Venus and not far from Michelangelo’s David,will offer definitive proof of how the naked form of the human body can be used to express concepts and stir sensations that are vastly different. And the effort to bring form out of brute matter, something which obsessed Michelangelo all his life, seems to still weigh heavily today on the shoulders of Giuseppe Penone in his arduous hollowing out of massive tree trunks, just as it is echoed in the forms carved out of concrete by Antony Gormley.

Giulio Paolini’s L’altra Figura will be located almost opposite Bill Viola’s video Surrender: two contemporary ways of reappraising and interpreting the theme of mirroring and reproducibility that lead, in the left arm of the Tribuna, to the 19th-century Salone dei Gessi, filled with plaster casts that were created so lely to be reproduced.

The theme of reflection is also explored in Alfredo Pirri’s floor of fractured mirrors, in Olaf Nicolai’s work Portrait of the Artist as a Weeping Narcissus, whose tears ripple the surface and alter the reflected image, and in Michelangelo Pistoletto’s mirror picture Sacra conversazione, which includes us in a conversation of the present day.

Metaphorically, mirroring becomes a merging with the gaze of the visitor, who is conceptually made part o f the creative process in Rineke Dijkstra’s video installation that tells of a slow observation and reproduction of one of Picasso’s pictures, in Thomas Struth’s photo in front of Dürer’s self-portrait and in Martin Creed’s performance with athletes running swiftly through the spaces of the gallery.

Marcel Duchamp, L'invers de la peinture, 1955 circa, 73,5 x 48 cm ,private collection, by courtesy of collector


Th
e reproduction, repetition and circulation of images in the history of art is tackled from a critical perspective in the works of Marcel Duchamp, Andy Warhol, Luigi Ghirri, Hans Peter Feldmann and Ketty La Rocca, which refer directly to icons familiar to everyone. In his Untitled, Jannis Kounellis will recall the iconography and sense of tragedy of the Crucifixion, a theme tackled in a different way in Alberto Burri’s work and in Renato Ranaldi’s Triumphans, while the gold or ultramarine monochromes of Yves Klein can be related to the gold grounds of the 14th-century altarpieces.

Yves Klein, L’esclave de Michel-Ange, 1962, pure pigment and synthetic resin on synthetic resin, 60 x 22 x 15 cm, © Yves Klein, ADAGP, Paris


T
he casts of the David’s eyes in Claudio Parmiggiani’s work po se the problem of the fragment, while Leoncillo and Luigi Ontani’s images of Saint Sebastian present different visions of that sacred iconography. The gaze at the past will appear emblematic and mysterious in Alberto Savinio’s Nettuno Pescatore as well as in Gino de Dominicis’s Urvasi e Gilgamesh. Interesting reflections on the work of the past will also be provided by Francis Bacon’s Figure sitting (the Cardinal), Pablo Picasso’s Arlequín con espejo and Sol LeWitt’s drawings of Piero della Francesca’s frescoes, as well as by the ovoid volumes of Luciano Fabro’s Il giudizio di Paride or Eliseo Mattiacci’s large iron sculpture Carro solare del Montefeltro. Memory as recognition of origins will be the focus of Fiona Tan’s film Provenance, and the classical elements of museum architecture are the form out of which Antonio Catelani develops his Klettersteig. (©Art of the Day)

Firenze Musei


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