London

Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs – London – UK

Henri Matisse - Blue Nude (II) 1952 - Centre Pompidou, MNAM-CCI, Dist. RMN-Grand Palais / Droits réservés © Succession Henri Matisse / DACS 2013

Henri Matisse – Blue Nude (II) 1952 – Centre Pompidou, MNAM-CCI, Dist. RMN-Grand Palais / Droits réservés © Succession Henri Matisse / DACS 2013


From  April 17 to September 7 2014 – Tate Modern

Henri Matisse is a giant of modern art. This landmark show explores the final chapter in his career in which he began ‘carving into colour’ and his series of spectacular cut-outs was born.

The exhibition represents a once-in-a-lifetime chance to see so many of the artist’s works in one place and discover Matisse’s final artistic triumph.
In his late sixties, when ill health first prevented Matisse from painting, he began to cut into painted paper with scissors to make drafts for a number of commissions. In time, Matisse chose cut-outs over painting: he had invented a new medium.

Henri Matisse - The Sheaf 1953 - Collection University of California, Los Angeles. Hammer Museum © Succession Henri Matisse / DACS 2013

Henri Matisse – The Sheaf 1953 – Collection University of California, Los Angeles. Hammer Museum © Succession Henri Matisse / DACS 2013

From snowflowers to dancers, circus scenes and a famous snail, the exhibition showcases a dazzling array of 120 works made between 1936 and 1954. Bold, exuberant and often large in scale, the cut-outs have an engaging simplicity coupled with incredible creative sophistication.

The exhibition marks an historic moment, when treasures from around the world can be seen together. Tate’s The Snail 1953 is shown alongside its sister work Memory of Oceania 1953 and Large Composition with Masks 1953 at 10 metres long. A photograph of Matisse’s studio reveals that these works were initially conceived as a unified whole, and this is the first time they will have been together since they were made. Matisse’s famous series of Blue Nudes represent the artist’s renewed interest in the figure.

Tate Modern


Veronese: Magnificence in Renaissance Venice – London – UK

Paolo Veronese (1528-1588) 'The Adoration of the Kings', 1573 Oil on canvas. 355.6 x 320 cm © The National Gallery, London

Paolo Veronese (1528-1588) ‘The Adoration of the Kings’, 1573 – Oil on canvas. 355.6 x 320 cm © The National Gallery, London


From 19 March to 15 June 2014 – The National Gallery

The National Gallery began with a unique asset when it worked on the project of a retrospective of Veronese, since it owns ten paintings by the Venetian master, among them The Family of Darius before Alexander or Adoration of the Magi). But they had to group together the remaining 40 works of art, and we know how museums hesitate to lend their works. While it was unconceivable to move Wedding at Cana from the Louvre, the frescoes of the palace of the Doges or from the church of the Frari, but what is brought together in London is nevertheless a first class choice …

Paolo Veronese (1528-1588), 'Perseus and Andromeda', 1575-80 - Oil on canvas. 260 x 211 cm - Rennes, Musée des Beaux-Arts

Paolo Veronese (1528-1588), ‘Perseus and Andromeda’, 1575-80 – Oil on canvas. 260 x 211 cm – Rennes, Musée des Beaux-Arts

We will admire works by Paolo Caliari (1528-1588) –his real name, the great rival of Tintoretto- such as the Mystical Marriage of Saint Catherine (Accademia, Venice), the Bella Nani from the Louvre and two portraits of men, from Palazzo Pitti and the Getty Center. The works of so famous an artist have been scat tered all over the globe and re-encounters can be surprising. One for example, is the one between two panels of an altarpiece from the little town of San Benedetto Po, separated since the 18th century that will once again live side by side, for a short period.

The National Gallery


Turner and the Sea – London – United Kingdom

J.M.William Turner - Staffa, Fingal's Cave - 122 x 91.5 cm - oil on canvas 1832 - Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut, USA

J.M.William Turner – Staffa, Fingal’s Cave – 122 x 91.5 cm – oil on canvas 1832 – Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut, USA


From 22 November 2013 to 21 April 2014 – National Maritime Museum

According to the legend Turner asked to be tied to the mast of his ship. Not to imitate Ulysses and resist the call of the mermaids, but rather to be able to closely observe a storm … This anecdote, whether it is apocryphal or not, only confirms the close relationship Turner (1775-1851) had with the sea. The English painter chose it as his main subject in half of his paintings, ranging from traditional seascapes to pre-Impressionist renderings. It is therefore no surprise both seasoned sea-dogs and armchair aesthetes have been awaiting this retrospective for a long time. It groups together pieces brought in from abroad, such as his Whale ship from the Metropolitan Museum in New York or his The wreck of a transport ship at the foundation Calouste Gulbenkian foundation in Lisbon.

J.M.William Turner - The Battle of Trafalgar, 21 October 1805 - National Maritime Museum

J.M.William Turner – The Battle of Trafalgar, 21 October 1805 – National Maritime Museum

This is also an opportunity for visitors to see one of his masterpieces, his version of the battle of Trafalgar. The nearly 4-meter long painting, the only royal commission the painter ever received throughout his career, was greatly criticized for its lack of veracity by those who lived the event.

National Maritime Museum


Australia – London – United Kingdom

Sidney Nolan, Ned Kelly, 1946. Enamel on composition board, 90.8 x 121.5 cm. - National Gallery of Australia, Canberra. Gift of Sunday Reed 1977;

Sidney Nolan, Ned Kelly, 1946. Enamel on composition board, 90.8 x 121.5 cm. – National Gallery of Australia, Canberra. Gift of Sunday Reed 1977;

From September 21 to December 2013 – Royal Academy of Arts
Marking the first major survey of Australian art in the UK for 50 years, this exhibition will span more than 200 years from 1800 to the present day and seeks to uncover the fascinating social and cultural evolution of a nation through its art.

Frederick McCubbin, The Pioneer, 1904. Oil on canvas, 225.0 x 295.7 cm - National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne. Felton Bequest, 1906

Frederick McCubbin, The Pioneer, 1904. Oil on canvas, 225.0 x 295.7 cm – National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne. Felton Bequest, 1906

Australia has two aspects: that of the penitentiary, similar to New-Caledonia or Cayenne, a legendary land at the antipodes, but a new nation as well, full of energy and space. Two centuries of art transcribe this symphony in Australia at the Royal Academy of Arts

Royal Academy of Arts


Sylvia Pankhurst – London – UK

Sylvia Pankhurst, self-portrait in prison dress - c. 1907 - pastel and charcoal.

Sylvia Pankhurst, self-portrait in prison dress – c. 1907 – pastel and charcoal.


From the 16th of September 2013 to the 23rd of  March 2014 – Tate Britain

Sylvia Pankhurst (1882–1960) made a profound impact on the fight for women’s rights as both an artist and a campaigner. Trained at the Manchester Municipal School of Art and the Royal College of Art, she was a key figure in the work of the Women’s Social and Political Union (WSPU) set up with her mother Emmeline and sister Christabel in 1903, using her artistic skills to further the cause.

Pankhurst’s lifelong interest was in the rights of working women. In 1907 she spent several months touring industrial communities documenting the working and living conditions of women workers. Her combination of artworks with written accounts provided a vivid picture of the lives of women workers and made a powerful argument for improvement in working conditions and pay equality with men.

Sylvia Pankhurst, Old Fashioned Pottery: Transferring the Pattern onto the Biscuit 1907 - Gouache on paper - House of Commons

Sylvia Pankhurst, Old Fashioned Pottery: Transferring the Pattern onto the Biscuit 1907 – Gouache on paper – House of Commons


I
n 1907 Sylvia Pankhurst toured northern England and Scotland to document the lives of women workers. Living in the communities she studied, she painted and wrote about industrial processes and the women who performed them. Working in gouache, which she found ideal for working quickly under factory conditions, her studies of women at work were unusual for the time in their unsentimental observation and their focus on individual workers.

Tate Britain


Barocci: Brilliance and Grace – London – UK

Federico Barocci, Italian, c.1533–1612; Study for the Head of Saint John the Evangelist for the Entombment, c.1580; oil on paper, mounted on linen; 16 5/8 x 12 3/4 inches; National Gallery of Art, Washington, Ailsa Mellon Bruce Fund 1979; image courtesy National Gallery of Art, Washington

Federico Barocci, Italian, c.1533–1612; Study for the Head of Saint John the Evangelist for the Entombment, c.1580; oil on paper, mounted on linen; 16 5/8 x 12 3/4 inches; National Gallery of Art, Washington, Ailsa Mellon Bruce Fund 1979; image courtesy National Gallery of Art, Washington


From February 27 to May 19, 2013 – The National Gallery

Experience the charm and sensitivity of Barocci’s masterpieces – never before seen outside Italy.

Federico Barocci (about 1533–1612) is celebrated as one of the most talented artists of late 16th century Italy. Fascinated by the human form, he fused charm and compositional harmony with an unparalleled sensitivity to colour.

The exhibition will showcase Federico Barocci’s most spectacular altarpieces, including his famous ‘Entombment’ from Senigallia and ‘Last Supper’ from Urbino Cathedral, thanks to the cooperation of the Soprintendenze delle Marche.

The display assembles the majority of Barocci’s greatest altarpieces and paintings, together with sequences of dazzling preparatory drawings, allowing visitors to understand how each picture evolved and revealing the fertility of Barocci’s imagination, the diversity of his working methods and the sheer beauty and grace of his art.

Federico Barocci, Italian, c.1533-1612; Entombment of Christ, 1579-82; oil on canvas; framed.

Federico Barocci, Italian, c.1533-1612; Entombment of Christ, 1579-82; oil on canvas; framed.

Barocci’s works, drawn from life and inspired by the people and animals that surrounded him, are characterised by a warmth and humanity that transform his religious subjects into themes with which all can identify.

He was an incessant and even obsessive draughtsman, preparing every composition with prolific studies in every conceivable medium.

Highly revered by his patrons during his lifetime, Barocci combined the beauty of the High Renaissance with the dynamism of what was to become known as the Baroque, a genre he was instrumental in pioneering. When he died in 1612, he was not only among the highest paid painters in Italy, but also one of the most influential.

The National Gallery


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