December 10th, 2010 until February 5th, 2011 – Galerie Krinzinger
Eva Schlegel was born in Hall in Tirol, Austria, in 1960. Her work, which features a technique combining lacquer with oil paints, is grouped in cycles such as Wolkenbilder (Cloud Formations) and Katastrophenbilder (Pictures of Disaster). She achieves particularly disorienting effects by blurring the boundaries between photography, painting and collage. Schlegel, born in 1960, has made a name for herself in Europe and beyond through a large number of exhibitions.
Her work has been extensively exhibited at galleries and museums in Europe, the Sydney Biennial and the Venice Biennale. She has had solo exhibitions at the Neue Galerie Joanneum, Graz, the Museum Moderner Kunst, Vienna, and the Museum für Lackkunst, Münster.

The Vienna based artist has worked successfully for many years on an international level in the fields of photography, installation and site-specific intervention. She was teaching for ten years as Professor for Photography at the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna. Eva Schlegel realized many projects in public space using photography as well as new technologies. Last year three permanent projects were finished at Novartis-Campus (2007) in Basel, which have been published by Hatje Cantz in 2008. On Eva Schlegels home page (evaschlegel.com) you will find more information both on her work and her public interventions. The artist is also shown at artnet.
Her work, which features a technique combining lacquer with oil paints, is grouped in cycles such as Wolkenbilder (Cloud Formations) and Katastrophenbilder (Pictures of Disaster). She achieves particularly disorienting effects by blurring the boundaries between photography, painting and collage. Schlegel, born in 1960, has made a name for herself in Europe and beyond through a large number of exhibitions.
The series „Clouds and more’ from 2008 (47 x 34,5 cm) deals with the phenomenon of lenticular clouds. Eva Schlegel transforms photos mostly found on the internet into photoengravings. The strange ufo-like celestial formations, already known to italian fresco painting of the fifteenth century, function similarly to sketches. In Eva Schlegel’s work, the weightlessness and the fanciful-utopian appearance of these clouds is confronted with the terrestrial everyday character of the landscape and the architecture. It is exactly the use of found photos in photoengraving which points out to this transition between the immaterial and the material and enables an abstract reading of the work.

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