Frida Kahlo (1907-1954) - Autorretrato con Traje de Terciopelo 1926 - Collection privée - © Photo Francisco Kochen - © ADAGP, Paris 2013

Frida Kahlo (1907-1954) – Autorretrato con Traje de Terciopelo 1926 – Collection privée – © Photo Francisco Kochen – © ADAGP, Paris 2013


Until January 13th, 2014 – Musée de L’Orangerie

She is the myth no one can ignore: an artist who goes beyond her atrocious physical pains and imposes her femininity in a country where man is king. Her lover and then husband, mural artist Diego Rivera, was for a longtime the best known of the two. But today, Frida Kahlo is the real icon. The musée de l’Orangerie places her today face to face with her half Diego but she is the real star of this contained exhibition : some fifty oil paintings on canvas, masonite, aluminum, etc., aside from the drawings and photographs, most of them on loan from the Dolores Olmedo collection, one of the main collectors of the two artists.

Diego Rivera (Mexican, 1886 – 1957), Autorretrato Con Chambergo, 1907, oil on canvas, Museo Dolores Olmedo. © 2012 Banco de México Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Museums Trust, Mexico, D. F. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Diego Rivera (Mexican, 1886 – 1957), Autorretrato Con Chambergo, 1907, oil on canvas, Museo Dolores Olmedo. © 2012 Banco de México Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Museums Trust, Mexico, D. F. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

While Kahlo’s style veers toward the flattened surrealism of Mexican folklore, Rivera engages in an artistic conversation with the burgeoning European movements of the time, toying with trends like Cubism and abstraction. Yet while their styles diverge, both 20th century artists were deeply rooted in the history and culture of Mexico, and have forever marked the country’s artistic tradition.

Frida Kahlo - Self Portrait with Small Monkey

Frida Kahlo – Self Portrait with Small Monkey

The colors of Mexico explode in each of her still lives, whether with corn, manioc, prickly pears or arums, in her poisonous vegetations, or in her portraits of Indian women from the South (the famous mothers from the isthmus of Tehuantepec). She has a rage for living that can be seen in the little room d edicated to Frida’s “self-portraits of suffering”, in which she draws herself bedridden and mutilated. One can be indifferent to her art but her energy fascinates us all …

Musée de L’Orangerie