September 12, 2010 – January 30, 2011 – The Museum of Latin American Art – Long Beach
The Museum of Latin American Art (MOLAA) is proud to join the Museo de Arte Carrillo Gil (MACG), Mexico City, in presenting Siqueiros Paisajista / Siqueiros: Landscape Painter. This exhibition reveals the renowned Mexican muralist David Alfaro Siqueiros as a major landscape painter. The significance of the collaboration between MOLAA and the Museo de Arte Carrillo Gil has been recognized by the Mexican Consulate in Los Angeles who has made this exhibition an official part of its Mexico 2010 celebration which commemorates Mexico’s Bicentennial of Independence and the Centennial of its Revolution. “It is a privilege to celebrate Mexico’s Bicentennial with an exhibition of this caliber which reveals a lesser known side of one the great Mexican masters of 20th-century art,” said Richard P. Townsend, President and CEO of MOLAA. “We are especially pleased to show a number of Siqueiros’ most important landscape paintings drawn from the Carrillo Gil’s magnificent collection–examples that confirm his brilliance as a landscape painter as well as a muralist.”

This exhibition, the first of its kind to be presented anywhere, includes approximately half of the 150 landscape paintings that Siqueiros produced during his lifetime. “This is the most significant exhibition of Siqueiros to be seen in the last ten years,” stated MACG Director and exhibition curator Itala Schmelz. “It is the result of more than three years of collaboration that included the precedent-setting gathering of artwork from more than 20 different museum and private collections in Mexico and the U.S., scholarly research by Christopher Fulton and additional research by a team of nine talented catalogue essayists.” Featuring a selection of the most important landscape paintings and drawings, the exhibition reveals Siqueiros’ dynamic vision of futuristic cities, allegorical places and the environment. Utilizing an explosive color palette and experimental techniques, the landscape imagery is charged with the emotions of creation and destruction always present in the art of Siqueiros. “Traditionally landscape paintings offer views of idyllic vistas, but these landscapes offer scenes of a troubled world,” said MOLAA Senior Curator, Cynthia Mac Mullin. “The gathered works poignantly emphasize Siqueiros’ concern for humanity’s inability to serve its fellow men.  Although several paintings are about the past, such as The End of the World from 1936 painted in response to the Spanish Civil War and The Explosion of Hiroshima of 1955, protesting the inhumane ending World War II, they are still relevant today, mirroring humanity’s constant engagement with war and destruction.”

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