Tag: drawings

American artist Romaine Brooks and the roaring twenties – Venice – Italy

Romaine Brooks, “Autoritratto”

Romaine Brooks, “Autoritratto”

Until March 13, 2016 – Venice, Palazzo Fortuny

Beatrice Romaine Goddard was one of the most representative figures of the artistic scene of the 1920s
Paintings, drawings, photographs _ With this exhibition, the first ever in Italy to be dedicated to the American artist Romaine Brooks, we discover the non-conformist, refined and cosmopolitan community that animated the most sophisticated cultural circles of the Belle Époque in Paris, Capri and Venice: Jean Cocteau, Paul Morand, Luisa Casati, Ida Rubinstein and Gabriele d’Annunzio are just some of the characters who were privileged to be immortalised by the artist, famous for her palette of moonlight tones.

Gabriele d'Annunzio

Romaine Brooks, “Gabriele d’Annunzio, il poeta in esilio”, 1912, Olio su tela, 116×95 cm, Paris, Centre Pompidou

Curated by Jérôme Merceron on the basis of a project by Daniela Ferretti, the exhibition arises from the felicitous meeting with Lucile Audouy, a passionate and feisty collector in Paris, who has generously loaned a very important group of works for the exhibition in Venice, many of which never before seen in public.

Romaine Brooks, “La marchesa Casati”, 1920 circa, Olio su tela, 248 x 120 cm, Collezione Lucile Audouy © Photo Thomas Hennocque

Romaine Brooks, “La marchesa Casati”, 1920 circa, Olio su tela, 248 x 120 cm, Collezione Lucile Audouy © Photo Thomas Hennocque

Born in Rome in 1874 to American parents and married to pianist John Ellington Brooks, Beatrice Romaine Goddard was one of the most interesting figures of the artistic scene of the Twenties. Romantically linked to the writer Nathalie Clifford Barney and, simultaneously, to the dancer Ida Rubinstein – her model for many paintings -– the American artist also had an intense relationship with d’Annunzio, whom she immortalised in two famous portraits. Initially influenced by the painting of Whistler, she soon found her unmistakable signature style, one marked by an infinite variety of greys and old pinks and an uncanny ability to capture the soul of her subjects.

However, it is the drawings that are the deepest mirror of her tragic and lonely soul. Charged with a suffering poetry, emotion and mystery, irony and pessimism, these elements blend in the taut line devoid of any decorative frills that almost cuts into the paper without hesitation or second thoughts; they accompany us with modesty and apparent detachment through the meanders of an inner world, constantly poised between light and darkness.

Palazzo Fortuny


Auguste Rodin – Metamorphoses – Sophia – Bulgaria

The Thinker, large model, 1903 - Colour gesso, 182 x 108 x 141 cm, S. 161 - The Musée Rodin, Paris - Photo: Kristian Baraja

The Thinker, large model, 1903 – Colour gesso, 182 x 108 x 141 cm, S. 161 – The Musée Rodin, Paris -
Photo: Kristian Baraja


30 May – 15 September 2014 – The National Museum of Bulgarian Arts

The Metamorphoses Exhibition presents 80 sculptures by Auguste Rodin and 20 drawings of his from the collection of the Musée Rodin in Paris, displayed in Bulgaria for the first time. This project, initiated by Catherine Chevillot, Director of the Musée Rodin, 18 months ago, includes some of the most well-known and highly valued works of the “father of modern sculpture” as well as some relatively rare works, which have never been exhibited in front of the general public.

Sleep Drops or a Young Mother Kissing Her Child - Graphite crayon and water colour on paper, 25 x 32,5 cm, D.4805 - The Musée Rodin, Paris - Photo: Jean de Calan

Sleep Drops or a Young Mother Kissing Her Child – Graphite crayon and water colour on paper, 25 x 32,5 cm, D.4805 – The Musée Rodin, Paris – Photo: Jean de Calan

Divided in six separate sections, the exhibition allows us to cover Rodin’s overall work. The visitors will be able to see figures from “The Gates of Hell”, “Fragmentation of the Figures”, “Assemblages” and “Enlargements” – some key techniques in the artist’s approach. The role of the pedestal is also shown as a means of glorifying some of the sculptures; there are also drawings, which had a central role in Rodin’s creative process.

The National Museum of Bulgarian Arts


Franz Graf – See What Sees You – Vienna – Austria

Franz Graf, SIEheWASDICHSIEHET, 2009, Courtesy Galerie Krizinger © Bildrecht, Vienna, 2013

From Jan 29, 2014 until May 18, 2014 – Belvedere – 21er Haus
Franz Graf (born in Tulln in 1954) lives and works in Vienna and the Waldviertel region in Lower Austria. He studied with Oswald Oberhuber at the University of Applied Arts Vienna. From 1979 to 1984, he cooperated closely with Brigitte Kowanz. Between 1997 and 2006, he was a visiting professor at the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna.

His works are black and white and depict figures and abstract ornaments. Frequently, the basic shapes he uses are circles combined with letters, word fragments and quotes – his art is material poetry. Graf brings together drawings, photographs, audio and video art, prints and objects from daily life to create open systems that form aesthetic spaces of experience rather than multimedia installations.

For his exhibition at the 21er Haus in Vienna, Graf entangles the many levels of his oeuvre again to juggle emptiness and abundance, black-and-white contrasts, fine delicate details and large iconic, archaic and modern elements in his signature style.

For this purpose, he produces a new series of works that is juxtaposed with pieces by international and national contemporary artists as well as with works from the collections of the Belvedere and of the artist himself. The sum of these parts not only forms an exuberant exhibition in the main hall of the 21er Haus, but also a stage on which Franz Graf will permanently extend his installation throughout the duration of the exhibition. Additionally, it will host performances and collaborative art productions every other week.

Belvedere


Dürer – Frankfurt – Germany

Albrecht Dürer (1471–1528) - Der heilige Hieronymus im Studierzimmer, 1521

Albrecht Dürer (1471–1528) – Der heilige Hieronymus im Studierzimmer, 1521


From October 23. 2013 to February 2, 2014

It is very rare to have the opportunity to see all together as many works by Albert  (1471-1528), one of the major artists of the Renaissance. The show will encompass more than 280 works, including some 200 from Dürer many as prints, the art form the gold gilder’s son excelled in as well as a beautiful selection of paintings. It will feature the German master’s oeuvre in the full breadth and diversity of the artistic means of expression he employed. Panel and canvas paintings, drawings, prints made with various printmaking techniques, and books written and illustrated by Dürer will all be on view. Dürer’s on-going exploration of the works of German, Netherlandish and Italian artist colleagues will be one of the central themes of this Old Master exhibition in Frankfurt, which will place his works and their emergence in their historical context. To this end, works by forerunners, contemporaries and pupils such as Martin Schongauer, Hans Baldung Grien, Hans von Kulmbach, Jacopo de? Barbari, Giovanni Bellini, Joos van Cleve or Lucas van Leyden will enrich this major exhibition project.

Giovanni Bellini (zwischen 1430 und 1435–1516) - Portait eines Venezianers

Giovanni Bellini (zwischen 1430 und 1435–1516) – Portait eines Venezianers


A
lbert Dürer was a pioneer of copyright and mail order sales as well as salesmen and a favorite of the princes.
The anecdote of Rudolf II having a company of men on foot carrying :”The Feast of the Rosary” from Venice to Prague remains well known. Dürer was a virtuoso not only of portraits but of natural history (his Hare is a universal best-seller), an illustrator of painted glass and a writer. The panels of the famous Heller altarpiece have been brought together for this event while works by his contemporaries (Lucas de Leyde, Bellini or Schongauer) help the viewer to better understand his restless genius, which in his famous Melancholy delivers a manifesto of Western neurosis.

Albrecht Dürer (1471–1528), Portrait of an Unknown Man, 1521 (1524?). Oakwood, 50 x 36 cm. Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado. © Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado

Albrecht Dürer (1471–1528), Portrait of an Unknown Man, 1521 (1524?). Oakwood, 50 x 36 cm. Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado. © Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado


S
tädel Museum


Frida Kahlo – Diego Rivera – L’art en fusion – Paris – France

Frida Kahlo (1907-1954) - Autorretrato con Traje de Terciopelo 1926 - Collection privée - © Photo Francisco Kochen - © ADAGP, Paris 2013

Frida Kahlo (1907-1954) – Autorretrato con Traje de Terciopelo 1926 – Collection privée – © Photo Francisco Kochen – © ADAGP, Paris 2013


Until January 13th, 2014 – Musée de L’Orangerie

She is the myth no one can ignore: an artist who goes beyond her atrocious physical pains and imposes her femininity in a country where man is king. Her lover and then husband, mural artist Diego Rivera, was for a longtime the best known of the two. But today, Frida Kahlo is the real icon. The musée de l’Orangerie places her today face to face with her half Diego but she is the real star of this contained exhibition : some fifty oil paintings on canvas, masonite, aluminum, etc., aside from the drawings and photographs, most of them on loan from the Dolores Olmedo collection, one of the main collectors of the two artists.

Diego Rivera (Mexican, 1886 – 1957), Autorretrato Con Chambergo, 1907, oil on canvas, Museo Dolores Olmedo. © 2012 Banco de México Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Museums Trust, Mexico, D. F. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Diego Rivera (Mexican, 1886 – 1957), Autorretrato Con Chambergo, 1907, oil on canvas, Museo Dolores Olmedo. © 2012 Banco de México Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Museums Trust, Mexico, D. F. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

While Kahlo’s style veers toward the flattened surrealism of Mexican folklore, Rivera engages in an artistic conversation with the burgeoning European movements of the time, toying with trends like Cubism and abstraction. Yet while their styles diverge, both 20th century artists were deeply rooted in the history and culture of Mexico, and have forever marked the country’s artistic tradition.

Frida Kahlo - Self Portrait with Small Monkey

Frida Kahlo – Self Portrait with Small Monkey

The colors of Mexico explode in each of her still lives, whether with corn, manioc, prickly pears or arums, in her poisonous vegetations, or in her portraits of Indian women from the South (the famous mothers from the isthmus of Tehuantepec). She has a rage for living that can be seen in the little room d edicated to Frida’s “self-portraits of suffering”, in which she draws herself bedridden and mutilated. One can be indifferent to her art but her energy fascinates us all …

Musée de L’Orangerie


American Modern: Hopper to O’Keeffe – New York – NY

 Edward Hopper. House by the Railroad. 1925. Oil on canvas, 24 x 29" (61 x 73.7 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Given anonymously. Digital Image © The Museum of Modern Art, New York, Digital Imaging Studio

Edward Hopper. House by the Railroad. 1925. Oil on canvas, 24 x 29″ (61 x 73.7 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Given anonymously. Digital Image © The Museum of Modern Art, New York, Digital Imaging Studio


Until January 26, 2014 – Museum of Modern Art – MoMA

American Modern: Hopper to O’Keeffe takes a fresh look at the Museum’s holdings of American art made between 1915 and 1950, and considers the cultural preoccupations of a rapidly changing American society in the first half of the 20th century.

Florine Stettheimer - Family Portrait, II - Oil on canvas 46 1/4 x 64 5/8" (117.4 x 164 cm)  -  1933 - The Museum of Modern Art

Florine Stettheimer – Family Portrait, II – Oil on canvas 46 1/4 x 64 5/8″ (117.4 x 164 cm) – 1933 – The Museum of Modern Art

American Modern includes paintings, drawings, prints, photographs, and sculptures by more than 50 artists, bringing together some of the Museum’s most celebrated masterworks, including pieces by Charles Burchfield, Stuart Davis, Edward Hopper, Georgia O’Keeffe, Charles Sheeler, Florine Stettheimer, Alfred Stieglitz, and Andrew Wyeth.

Andrew Wyeth - 1948 - Christina's World - Tempera on gessoed panel - 81.9 cm × 121.3 cm (32¼ in × 47¾ in) - Museum of Modern Art, New York City

Andrew Wyeth – 1948 – Christina’s World – Tempera on gessoed panel – 81.9 cm × 121.3 cm (32¼ in × 47¾ in) – Museum of Modern Art, New York City

Contextualizing these works across mediums and amid lesser-seen but revelatory compositions, American Modern offers these artists’ views of the United States in a period of radical transformation, expressed in a variety of visual styles, artistic movements, and personal visions.

Georgia O'Keeffe (American, 1887–1986) - Abstraction Blue - 1927 - Oil on canvas - 40 1/4 x 30" (102.1 x 76 cm) - Copyright:© 2013 The Georgia O'Keeffe Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Georgia O’Keeffe (American, 1887–1986) – Abstraction Blue – 1927 – Oil on canvas – 40 1/4 x 30″ (102.1 x 76 cm) – Copyright:© 2013 The Georgia O’Keeffe Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

The selection of more than 100 works is organized thematically, depicting such subjects as urban and rural landscapes, scenes of industry, still-life compositions, and portraiture. Far from an encyclopedic view of American art of the period, the exhibition is a focused look at the strengths and surprises of MoMA’s collection in an area that has played a major role in the institution’s history.

Museum of Modern Art  – New York


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