Tag: masterpieces

Picasso and Spanish Modernity – Florence – Italy

Pablo Picasso (Malaga 1881–Mougins 1973) Portrait of Dora Maar 27 March 1939, oil on panel, 60 x 45 cm. Collection of the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía,Madrid, DE01840

Pablo Picasso (Malaga 1881–Mougins 1973) Portrait of Dora Maar 27
March 1939, oil on panel, 60 x 45 cm.
Collection of the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía,Madrid, DE01840


From 20 September 2014 to 25 January 2015 – La Mostra – Fondazione Palazzo Strozzi

The exhibition explores the major themes developed throughout the career of a painter who had the greatest impact on the history of the 20th century: art reflecting on art and on the relationship between the real and the super-real* and between nature and culture, the artist’s heartfelt involvement in the tragedy of unfolding history, the emergence of the monster with a human face, and the metaphor of erotic desire as a primary source of inspiration for the artist’s creativity and world vision.The exhibition also allows visitors to explore Picasso’s multi-faceted personality, the almost symbiotic bond that existed between his art and his life, between the work that he created and the time of his life in which he created it, while History with a capital “H” frequently made powerful inroads both into his pictures and into his life.

Juan Gris (Madrid 1887–Boulogne-Billancourt1927) Harlequin with Violin 1919, oil on canvas, 91.7 x 73 cm. Collection of the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid, DE01560

Juan Gris (Madrid 1887–Boulogne-Billancourt1927) Harlequin with Violin
1919, oil on canvas, 91.7 x 73 cm.
Collection of the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid, DE01560


P
icasso and Spanish Modernity comprises some ninety works by Picasso and other artists, ranging from painting to sculpture, drawing, engraving and even a film by José Val del Omar, thanks to the Fondazione Palazzo Strozzi’s synergistic cooperation with the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía in Madrid. The works of art on display include such celebrated masterpieces as Woman’s Head
(1910), Portrait of Dora Maar(1939) and The Painter and the Model (1963) by Picasso, Siurana, the Path(1917) and Figure and Bird in the Night (1945) by Miró and Dalí’s Arlequin (1927), along with Picasso’s drawings, engravings and preparatory paintings for his hugemasterpiece Guernica (1937), none of which have been displayed outside Spain in such vast numbers before now.

Fondazione Palazzo Strozzi


Turner and the Sea – London – United Kingdom

J.M.William Turner - Staffa, Fingal's Cave - 122 x 91.5 cm - oil on canvas 1832 - Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut, USA

J.M.William Turner – Staffa, Fingal’s Cave – 122 x 91.5 cm – oil on canvas 1832 – Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut, USA


From 22 November 2013 to 21 April 2014 – National Maritime Museum

According to the legend Turner asked to be tied to the mast of his ship. Not to imitate Ulysses and resist the call of the mermaids, but rather to be able to closely observe a storm … This anecdote, whether it is apocryphal or not, only confirms the close relationship Turner (1775-1851) had with the sea. The English painter chose it as his main subject in half of his paintings, ranging from traditional seascapes to pre-Impressionist renderings. It is therefore no surprise both seasoned sea-dogs and armchair aesthetes have been awaiting this retrospective for a long time. It groups together pieces brought in from abroad, such as his Whale ship from the Metropolitan Museum in New York or his The wreck of a transport ship at the foundation Calouste Gulbenkian foundation in Lisbon.

J.M.William Turner - The Battle of Trafalgar, 21 October 1805 - National Maritime Museum

J.M.William Turner – The Battle of Trafalgar, 21 October 1805 – National Maritime Museum

This is also an opportunity for visitors to see one of his masterpieces, his version of the battle of Trafalgar. The nearly 4-meter long painting, the only royal commission the painter ever received throughout his career, was greatly criticized for its lack of veracity by those who lived the event.

National Maritime Museum


Zurbarán – Ferrara – Italy

Zurbaran - The Vision of Saint Peter Nolasco -1629 - Oil on canvas, cm 179 x 223 - Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado

Zurbaran – The Vision of Saint Peter Nolasco -1629 – Oil on canvas, cm 179 x 223 – Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado


14 September 2013 to 6 January 2014 – Ferrara, Palazzo dei Diamanti

This exhibition dedicated to Zurbarán (1598 – 1664) is an opportunity to admire for the first time in Italy the masterpieces of one of the greatest interpreters of Baroque and religious counter-reformation art.

Zurbaran - XII Benjamin - Oil on canvas, cm 198 x 102 (c. 1640-45, Private collection)

Zurbaran – XII Benjamin – Oil on canvas, cm 198 x 102 (c. 1640-45, Private collection)


R
igorously selected works coming from museums and private collections in Europe and America retrace the key stages in Zurbarán career. Beginning with the early works with which the artist established his reputation in Seville (which was one of the centres of art in Spain, as was Florence in Italy), such as The Vision of St Peter Nolasco (1629, Madrid, Museo del Prado) or the later St Francis of Assisi in his tomb (1630-34, Milwaukee Art Museum), with their dramatic luminosity and contrasts inspired by the solemn works of Caravaggio and Ribera, to the sober lyricism of his later works dating from his Madrid period and his contact with Velázquez. In these, a lighter atmosphere prevails, and glimpses of cheerful landscapes and domestic details are revealed, as in the Immaculate Conception with St Joachim and Saint Anne (c. 1638-40, Edinburgh, Scottish National Gallery) or the Virgin and Child with the Infant St John (1662, Bilbao, Museo de Bellas Artes).

Zurbaran - Cup of Water and a Rose - Oil on canvas, cm 21,2 x 30,1(c. 1630, London, The National Gallery)

Zurbaran – Cup of Water and a Rose – Oil on canvas, cm 21,2 x 30,1(c. 1630, London, The National Gallery)


W
hat most advances formal renewal is without doubt the still lifes and depictions of allegorical themes, such as A Cup of Water and a Rose (c. 1630, London, The National Gallery) and Agnus Dei (c. 1634-40, San Diego Museum of Art). The poetic refinement of these paintings, in which the objects are set in a rarefied and silent atmosphere, is left to the simplicity of the composition, to the purity of the forms, and the way he uses the lighting. In these small pictures, as in the many still lifes to be found within various paintings, Zurbarán renders the forms as though purified by the light, in a crystalline vision of great detail and quiet monumentality.

Zurbaran - Saint Casilda - Oil on canvas, cm 171 x 107(c. 1635, Madrid, Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza)

Zurbaran – Saint Casilda – Oil on canvas, cm 171 x 107(c. 1635, Madrid, Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza)


A
mong the artist most original inventions are the great figures of the saints. These sophisticated portraits were immensely popular and were made in series especially for the New World. The sequences reunited in this exhibition include notable works such as Saint Casilda (c. 1635, Madrid, Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza), Benjamin (c. 1640-45, Private collection) and Saint Ursula (Genua, Palazzo Bianco), showing the artist ability to depict sacred episodes with charm and elegance, thanks to the poses, the masterly way the draperies are rendered and the brilliant palette. These majestic figures, turned towards the viewer like protagonist of a portrait, now as then, exercise a magnetic charm.

Palazzo dei Diamanti


The Springtime of the Renaissance – Paris – France

Donatello (Donato di Niccolò di Betto Bardi; Florence vers 1386-1466). Buste reliquaire de San Rossore, vers 1424- 1427, bronze fondu ciselé, doré et argenté. Pise, musée national de San Matteo, inv. 1720 © Scala, Florence.

Donatello (Donato di Niccolò di Betto Bardi; Florence vers 1386-1466). Buste reliquaire de San Rossore, vers 1424-
1427, bronze fondu ciselé, doré et argenté. Pise, musée national de San Matteo, inv. 1720 © Scala, Florence.


From September 26, 2013 to January 6, 2014 – Le Louvre museum

The Springtime of the Renaissance deals with the genesis of this major artistic and cultural movement, which first arose in Florence in the early years of the 15th century.

Sculpture, an essential aspect of this rebirth, is the central focus of this exhibition. Some 140 works are presented, including several monumental ones, grouped into ten thematic sections. In addition to sculptures, the exhibition also features paintings, drawings, manuscripts, silver and gold pieces and tin-glazed earthenware.

Donatello (Donato di Niccolò di Betto Bardi; Florentine, c. 1386–1466). Spiritelli from the Cantoria (Choir Loft) in the Duomo, 1439. Bronze with traces of gilding; marble bases (not originally part of the sculpture). Institut de France, Musée Jacquemart-André, Paris.

Donatello (Donato di Niccolò di Betto Bardi; Florentine, c. 1386–1466). Spiritelli from the Cantoria (Choir Loft) in the Duomo, 1439. Bronze with traces of gilding; marble bases (not originally part of the sculpture). Institut de France, Musée Jacquemart-André, Paris.


S
culptures by Donatello serve as one of the threads running through the exhibition, which presents several of the greatest masterpieces by this artist, considered by many as the most creative exponent of the Renaissance. However his works do not in any way eclipse the virtuosity of contributions by other illustrious sculptors, including Ghiberti, Michelozzo, Desiderio da Settignano and Mino da Fiesole.

Filippo Brunelleschi (Florentine, 1377–1446) or Nanni di Banco (Florentine, active c. 1405–1421). Madonna and Child (Fiesole Madonna), c. 1405–10. Polychromed and gilt terra-cotta. Diocesi di Fiesole, Fiesole, on loan to the Museo Bandini.

Filippo Brunelleschi (Florentine, 1377–1446) or Nanni di Banco (Florentine, active c. 1405–1421). Madonna and
Child (Fiesole Madonna), c. 1405–10. Polychromed and gilt terra-cotta. Diocesi di Fiesole, Fiesole, on loan to the Museo Bandini.


T
he ten sections of the exhibition form a coherent whole, placing emphasis in some cases on themes and styles, and in others on the social and cultural context serving as the unifying frame joining together the works on display.
The major influence of Greek and Roman antiquity is constantly present throughout all of the sections, showing how important works of antiquity had a key impact on artistic creation during this period. The panoply of rich and varied approaches on view, all intimately linked, help unveil the mysteries behind the flowering of the Florentine Renaissance.
Several of the works have been returned to their former glory after a vast two-year restoration campaign led jointly by the Fondazione Palazzo Strozzi and the Louvre, allowing visitors to fully appreciate masterpieces such as Donatello’s imposing gilt bronze statue of Saint Louis of Anjou (also known as Saint Louis of Toulouse, 1425) from the Museo dell’Opera di Santa Croce.

It was for the city’s major public buildings, including the Duomo, the Campanile, and Orsanmichele, that artists such as Donatello, Ghiberti, Nanni di Banco and Michelozzo would create their finest masterpieces.
These monumental public sculptures eloquently bear witness to the fundamental stylistic transformations at work during the Florentine Renaissance, creating a new artistic language while helping to convey the supreme heights reached by Florentine civilization.
Major themes from classical antiquity, as interpreted in particular by Donatello, were gradually assimilated and transformed to create the new artistic language of the Renaissance.
Sculptors of the Florentine Renaissance also sought to emulate the great equestrian monuments of antiquity, which decorated public places to celebrate military virtue.

Donatello (Donato di Niccolò di Betto Bardi; Florentine, c. 1386–1466). Horse’s Head, known as the Protome Carafa, c. 1455. Bronze. Museo Archeologico Nazionale, Naples.

Donatello (Donato di Niccolò di Betto Bardi; Florentine, c. 1386–1466). Horse’s Head, known as the Protome Carafa, c. 1455. Bronze. Museo Archeologico Nazionale, Naples.


T
he invention of linear perspective by Brunelleschi and the quest for a rational, mathematical ordering of space are explored in the “History in Perspective” section. Without a doubt, the resulting experiments found their most creative expression in sculpture, here juxtaposed with painted works. Brought to great heights first and foremost in Donatello’s basreliefs, this quest notably produced such works as the predella depicting Saint George and the Dragon (Museo Nazionale del Bargello), a supreme Renaissance masterpiece, combining linear and atmospheric perspective to achieve an open, rational and infinite space.

Desiderio da Settignano (Settignano c. 1429–Florence 1464). Marietta Strozzi, c. 1464. Marble. Skulpturensammlung und Museum für Byzantinische Kunst, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Bode-Museum, Berlin.

Desiderio da Settignano (Settignano c. 1429–Florence 1464). Marietta Strozzi, c. 1464. Marble. Skulpturensammlung und Museum für Byzantinische Kunst, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Bode-Museum, Berlin.


T
he civic aspect of artistic production in Florence eventually gave way to more prevalent private patronage, which began to play a decisive role with the advent of the wealthy Cosimo de’ Medici, founder of the political dynasty that would rule Florence from 1434 to 1537. This period thus saw the transition from Florentine sovereignty and selfsufficiency, or libertas, symbolized by public commissions, to a private patronage already colored by the burgeoning hegemony of the Medicis. This ostentatious bent would find one of its most forceful expressions in the fashion for private bust portraits, a new genre that arose at mid-century.

Musee du Louvre


Modigliani et l’Ecole de Paris – Martigny – Switzerland

Amedeo Modigliani - Hanka Zborowska - 1919 - oil on canvas - 55 x 39 cm - Private Collection

Amedeo Modigliani – Hanka Zborowska – 1919 – oil on canvas – 55 x 39 cm – Private Collection


From June 21 to November 24, 2013 – Fondation Pierre Gianadda

The exhibition will feature approximately 80 works from the collections of the Centre Pompidou and supplemented by loans from 17 loans of private Collections and Swiss and foreign museums. These masterpieces, many of which never or rarely left the Institution, are presented as both iconic portraits and nudes by Modigliani, as well as works of the leading figures of the School of Paris, who were his friends and sometimes its inspirers.

This exhibition focuses on the development of the work of Amedeo Modigliani (1884 – 1920) after his arrival in Paris in 1906 until his death in 1920 it also focuses especially on the friendship between Modigliani and Constantin Brancusi. The young Modigliani is indeed very quickly captivated by the unique and radical character of the Romanian sculptor whose will to truth and counting inspire his search for “wholeness.” An entire room of the exhibition is devoted to sculptures of these two artists and their modernist friends, Jacques Lipchitz, Henri Laurens and Ossip Zadkine.

Amedeo Modigliani - Reclining Nude Arms Folded under Her Head - 1916 - oil on canvas -  E. G. Buhrle Collection Switzerland

Amedeo Modigliani – Reclining Nude Arms Folded under Her Head – 1916 – oil on canvas – E. G. Buhrle Collection Switzerland


E
xposed also is of course the best artists of the School of Paris painters and sculptors who came most from Central Europe, which have made ​​Paris the main focus of artistic creation of the moment and an international capital of the avant-garde. The works of these artists arrived in France at the beginning of XX century, such as Chaim Soutine, Jules Pascin, Marc Chagall, Moïse Kisling, convey different aesthetics, marked by Expressionism and inspired by their local popular culture primitivism.

Amedeo Modigliani - Jean Alexandre, 1909 Oil on canvas, 81 x 60 cm Private collection

Amedeo Modigliani – Jean Alexandre, 1909 Oil on canvas, 81 x 60 cm Private collection


M
odigliani showed his independence and lack of parochialism by the diversity of his friends, met in its workshops of Montmartre and then Montparnasse: Suzanne Valadon and her son, Maurice Utrillo, André Utter, Jules Pascin, Gino Severini, Constantin Brancusi, Amadeo de Souza Cardoso, Max Jacob, Jacques Lipchitz, Ossip Zadkine, Moïse Kisling, Chaim Soutine, Georges Kars, Marc Chagall, DiegoRivera, André Derain, Ortiz de Zarate, Pablo Picasso they all created the environment in which he was operating.

Fondation Pierre Gianadda


Albrecht Dürer – Washington D.C. – USA

Albrecht Dürer - Abduction on a Unicorn

Albrecht Dürer – Abduction on a Unicorn, 1516 – etching (iron) – Meder, no. 67- Rosenwald Collection


From March 24 to June 9, 2013 – National Gallery of Art

Master Drawings, Watercolors, and Prints from the Albertina
Albrecht Dürer (1471–1528) has long been considered the greatest German artist, uniquely combining the status held in Italian art by Michelangelo in the sixteenth century, by Raphael in the 18th and 19th centuries, and by Leonardo da Vinci in our own day.

While Dürer’s paintings were prized, his most influential works were his drawings, watercolors, engravings, and woodcuts. They were executed with his distinctively northern sense of refined precision and exquisite craftsmanship. The finest collection of Dürer’s drawings and watercolors is that of the Albertina in Vienna, Austria.

Albrecht Dürer - Portrait of a Clergyman (Johann Dorsch?), 1516 - oil on parchment on fabric painted surface: 41.7 x 32.7 cm (16 7/16 x 12 7/8 in.) Samuel H. Kress Collection

Albrecht Dürer – Portrait of a Clergyman (Johann Dorsch?), 1516 – oil on parchment on fabric painted surface: 41.7 x 32.7 cm (16 7/16 x 12 7/8 in.) Samuel H. Kress Collection

The Albertina’s works by Dürer have been acquired over many years, but the museum’s ability to amass such a collection of masterpieces results from primary sources that go directly back to the Holy Roman Emperor Rudolf II. Dürer was his favorite artist, and the emperor spared no expense in searching for Dürer’s art. He used imperial ambassadors and the machinery of state to succeed in his purchases, among them extraordinary acquisitions from the Imhoff family in Nuremberg, whose works included Dürer’s personal estate.

This groundbreaking exhibition is a culmination of decades of acquisition, study, and exhibitions of early German art at the National Gallery of Art. It presents 91—including most—of the superb Dürer watercolors and drawings from the Albertina and 27 of the museum’s best related engravings and woodcuts. It also includes 19 closely related drawings and prints from the Gallery’s own collection.

National Gallery of Art


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