Tag: museum of modern art

The Paris of Toulouse-Lautrec: Prints and Posters – New York – New York

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (French, 1864–1901). Aristide Bruant dans son cabaret (Aristide Bruant in His Cabaret). 1893. Lithograph, sheet: 53 9/16 x 37 15/16 in. (136 x 96.3 cm) The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Emilio Sanchez, 1961

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (French, 1864–1901). Aristide Bruant dans son cabaret (Aristide Bruant in His Cabaret). 1893. Lithograph, sheet: 53 9/16 x 37 15/16 in. (136 x 96.3 cm) The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Emilio Sanchez, 1961


From Jul 26 2014 to Mar 22, 2015 – The Museum of Modern Art, New York

A preeminent artist of belle époque Paris, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901) brought the language of the late-19th-century avant-garde to a broad public through his famous posters, prints, and illustrations for journals and magazines. A cultural nexus, he connected artists, performers, authors, intellectuals, and society figures of his day, creating a bridge between the brothels and society salons of the moment. His work allows entry into many facets of Parisian life, from politics to visual culture and the rise of popular entertainment in the form of cabarets and café-concerts.

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (French, 1864–1901). Jane Avril. 1899. Lithograph, sheet: 22 1/16 x 15 in. (56 x 38.1 cm) The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, 1946

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (French, 1864–1901). Jane Avril. 1899. Lithograph, sheet: 22 1/16 x 15 in. (56 x 38.1 cm) The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, 1946


T
his exhibition, drawn almost exclusively from The Museum of Modern Art’s stellar collection of posters, lithographs, printed ephemera, and illustrated books, is the first MoMA exhibition in 30 years dedicated solely to Lautrec, and features over 100 examples of the best-known works created during the apex of his career.

Museum of Modern Art – MoMa


Beyond Pop Art: A Tom Wesselmann Retrospective – Denver – Colorado

Tom Wesselmann (American, b.1931, d.2004), Still Life #60, 1973.Oil on canvas; 122 1/4 x 333 x 86 1/2 in. Lent by Claire Wesselmann. © Estate of Tom Wesselmann/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY, Photo Credit: Jeffrey Sturges.

Tom Wesselmann (American, b.1931, d.2004), Still Life #60, 1973.Oil on canvas; 122 1/4 x 333 x 86 1/2 in. Lent by Claire Wesselmann. © Estate of Tom Wesselmann/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY, Photo Credit: Jeffrey Sturges.


July 13, 2014 – September 14, 2014 – Denver Art Museum

Beyond Pop Art: A Tom Wesselmann Retrospective features the work of painter Tom Wesselmann, who is widely regarded as one of the leading figures of American pop art.

Tom Wesselmann (American, b.1931, d.2004), Smoker, 1 (Mouth, 12), 1967. Oil on canvas, in two parts; Overall 9' 7/8" x 7' 1" (276.6 x 216 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Susan Morse Hilles Fund, 1968. © Estate of Tom Wesselmann/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY, Photo Credit: Jeffrey Sturges.

Tom Wesselmann (American, b.1931, d.2004), Smoker, 1 (Mouth, 12), 1967. Oil on canvas, in two parts; Overall 9′ 7/8″ x 7′ 1″ (276.6 x 216 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Susan Morse Hilles Fund, 1968. © Estate of Tom Wesselmann/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY, Photo Credit: Jeffrey Sturges.


O
rganized chronologically, this exhibition follows the development of Wesselmann’s work, series by series, from the earliest abstract collages to his well-known series, Great American Nude, and still lifes of his pop period to the cut-steel drawings and Sunset Nudes of his late work.

Tom Wesselmann (American, b.1931, d.2004), Landscape #5, 1965. Oil on canvas and Liquitex and collage on canvas; 84 x 144 1/2 x 18 in. Lent by Claire Wesselmann. © Estate of Tom Wesselmann/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY, Photo Credit: Jeffrey Sturges.

Tom Wesselmann (American, b.1931, d.2004), Landscape #5, 1965. Oil on canvas and Liquitex and collage on canvas; 84 x 144 1/2 x 18 in. Lent by Claire Wesselmann. © Estate of Tom Wesselmann/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY, Photo Credit: Jeffrey Sturges.


B
eyond Pop Art features approximately 100 works, including the larger-than-life Still Life #60 (pictured above) and Screen Star.

Denver Art Museum


Josef Koudelka Retrospective – Tokyo – Japan

CZECHOSLOVAKIA. Prague. August 1968. Invasion by Warsaw Pact troops. Near the Radio headquarters

CZECHOSLOVAKIA. Prague. August 1968. Invasion by Warsaw Pact troops. Near the Radio headquarters


From November 6, 2013 to January 13, 2014 – The National Museum of Modern Art

Josef Koudelka (born in Czechoslovakia in 1938) is one of the most important photographers in the world today. This exhibition traces his career from his earliest to his most recent works.

While working as a flight engineer, Koudelka became involved in photography in the early 1960s. He became a well-known figure in the Czechoslovakian photography world through his pictures of a Prague theater, which he came to shoot on the introduction of an acquaintance. In 1967, Koudelka quit his job and began working as a freelance photographer. The following year he shot Warsaw Pact troops as they invaded Prague. These photographs were anonymously distributed in the West, and as a result, Koudelka decided to leave the country in 1970.

FRANCE. Hauts-de-Seine. Parc de Sceaux. 1987.

FRANCE. Hauts-de-Seine. Parc de Sceaux. 1987.


A
fter living first in England and then France, Koudelka showed series such as Gypsies (1962-1970), which he had taken while still in Czechoslovakia, and Exiles (1970-1994), which he shot throughout Europe after his defection. In these poetic and uniquely powerful images, Koudelka captured the shadows of people’s modest lives in various towns. The photographs were highly esteemed as works that were imbued with profound insights into civilization during the 20th century, and Koudelka immediately rose to fame as a photographer in the West.

The first retrospective of the artist’s work was held in Koudelka’s former homeland of Czech Republic at the National Gallery in Prague in 2002 before traveling to Turkey and Mexico. In addition to vintage prints that have rarely been shown in the past, and a series of panorama photographs called the Chaos series (1986-2012), which he has continued since the late ’80s (shown here in a new structure that includes his most recent efforts), this exhibition, the artist’s first in Asia, introduces Josef Koudelka’s entire body of work.

The National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo


American Modern: Hopper to O’Keeffe – New York – NY

 Edward Hopper. House by the Railroad. 1925. Oil on canvas, 24 x 29" (61 x 73.7 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Given anonymously. Digital Image © The Museum of Modern Art, New York, Digital Imaging Studio

Edward Hopper. House by the Railroad. 1925. Oil on canvas, 24 x 29″ (61 x 73.7 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Given anonymously. Digital Image © The Museum of Modern Art, New York, Digital Imaging Studio


Until January 26, 2014 – Museum of Modern Art – MoMA

American Modern: Hopper to O’Keeffe takes a fresh look at the Museum’s holdings of American art made between 1915 and 1950, and considers the cultural preoccupations of a rapidly changing American society in the first half of the 20th century.

Florine Stettheimer - Family Portrait, II - Oil on canvas 46 1/4 x 64 5/8" (117.4 x 164 cm)  -  1933 - The Museum of Modern Art

Florine Stettheimer – Family Portrait, II – Oil on canvas 46 1/4 x 64 5/8″ (117.4 x 164 cm) – 1933 – The Museum of Modern Art

American Modern includes paintings, drawings, prints, photographs, and sculptures by more than 50 artists, bringing together some of the Museum’s most celebrated masterworks, including pieces by Charles Burchfield, Stuart Davis, Edward Hopper, Georgia O’Keeffe, Charles Sheeler, Florine Stettheimer, Alfred Stieglitz, and Andrew Wyeth.

Andrew Wyeth - 1948 - Christina's World - Tempera on gessoed panel - 81.9 cm × 121.3 cm (32¼ in × 47¾ in) - Museum of Modern Art, New York City

Andrew Wyeth – 1948 – Christina’s World – Tempera on gessoed panel – 81.9 cm × 121.3 cm (32¼ in × 47¾ in) – Museum of Modern Art, New York City

Contextualizing these works across mediums and amid lesser-seen but revelatory compositions, American Modern offers these artists’ views of the United States in a period of radical transformation, expressed in a variety of visual styles, artistic movements, and personal visions.

Georgia O'Keeffe (American, 1887–1986) - Abstraction Blue - 1927 - Oil on canvas - 40 1/4 x 30" (102.1 x 76 cm) - Copyright:© 2013 The Georgia O'Keeffe Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Georgia O’Keeffe (American, 1887–1986) – Abstraction Blue – 1927 – Oil on canvas – 40 1/4 x 30″ (102.1 x 76 cm) – Copyright:© 2013 The Georgia O’Keeffe Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

The selection of more than 100 works is organized thematically, depicting such subjects as urban and rural landscapes, scenes of industry, still-life compositions, and portraiture. Far from an encyclopedic view of American art of the period, the exhibition is a focused look at the strengths and surprises of MoMA’s collection in an area that has played a major role in the institution’s history.

Museum of Modern Art  – New York


Olga Tobreluts. The New Mythology – Moscow – Russia

Olga Tobreluts. Ups and downs. Oil on canvas. 2012


January 24 to February 24 2013 – Moscow Museum of Modern Art

The Moscow Museum of Modern Art in collaboration with Triumph Gallery present a large-scale retrospective exhibition of Olga Tobreluts, a Russian artist, who became well-known internationally, primarily as a pioneering media art artist and a creator of massive video installations. She is one of the first contemporary artists who picked modern computer technologies as a medium. The latter enabled Tobreluts to develop her own singular yet extremely recognizable style one can clearly tell even in her early works. Tobreluts’s artworks appear to be intricate manipulations, in which historical realities and myths of modern culture are melted together for the purpose of transforming them into a magical super reality.

Olga Tobreluts. Venus. Print. 2003. Courtesy of The Moscow House of Photography.

Olga Tobreluts gave up using computer technologies as her artistic medium in 2003. The year saw her return to painting. She managed to find out her own painting manner by employing ancient painting techniques. She keeps developing her manner while carrying out experiments with the chemical makeup of paints to expand her range of methods of light transmission.
The MMOMA retrospective exhibition will show Olga Tobreluts’ well-known series of works made available courtesy of several museum and private collections. Apart from the above, the artist’s experimental works will be put on display for the first time

Moscow Museum of Modern Art – MMOMA


Regarding Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years – New York – New York

Andy Warhol (American, 1928–1987). Self-Portrait, 1967. Acrylic and silkscreen on canvas, 72 x 72 in. (182.9 x 182.9 cm). Detroit Institute of Arts, Founders Society Purchase, Friends of Modern Art Fund. © 2012 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York


From September 18 to December 31, 2012 – The Metropolitan Museum of Art

For decades, critics have observed that Andy Warhol exerted an enormous impact on contemporary art, but no exhibition has yet explored the full nature or extent of that influence.

Ai Weiwei (Chinese, born 1957). Neolithic Vase with Coca-Cola Logo, 2010. Paint on Neolithic vase (5000–3000 B.C.), 9 3/4 x 9 3/4 x 9 3/4 in. (24.8 x 24.8 x 24.8 cm). Mary Boone, New York. Courtesy: Mary Boone Gallery, New York


T
hrough approximately forty-five works by Warhol alongside one hundred works by some sixty other artists, Regarding Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years juxtaposes prime examples of Warhol’s paintings, sculpture, and films with those by other artists who in key ways reinterpret, respond, or react to his groundbreaking work. What emerges is a fascinating dialogue between works of art and artists across generations.

Andy Warhol (American, 1928–1987). Big Campbell's Soup Can, 19¢ (Beef Noodle), 1962. Acrylic and graphite on canvas, 72 x 54 1/2 in. (182.9 x 138.4 cm). The Menil Collection, Houston. © 2012 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York


T
he exhibition is structured in five thematic sections: “Daily News: From Banality to Disaster,” “Portraiture: Celebrity and Power,” “Queer Studies: Shifting Identities,” “Consuming Images: Appropriation, Abstraction, and Seriality,” and “No Boundaries: Business, Collaboration, and Spectacle.”

Jeff Koons (American, born 1955). Michael Jackson and Bubbles, 1988. Porcelain, 42 x 70 1/2 x 32 1/2 in. (106.7 x 179.1 x 82.6 cm). San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Purchase through the Marian and Bernard Messenger Fund and restricted funds. © Jeff Koons


T
he Metropolitan Museum of Art


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