Tag: retrospective

Niki de Saint Phalle – Paris – France

Cheval et la Mariée, 1963, 235 x 300 x 120 cm, tissu, jouets, objets divers, grillage, Sprengel Museum, Hanovre, © BPK, Berlin, dist. Rmn-Grand Palais / Michael Herling / Aline Gwose

Cheval et la Mariée, 1963, 235 x 300 x 120 cm, tissu, jouets, objets divers, grillage, Sprengel Museum, Hanovre, © BPK, Berlin, dist. Rmn-Grand Palais / Michael Herling / Aline Gwose


From September 17, 2014 to February 2, 2015 – Grand Palais

Niki de Saint Phalle (1930 – 2002) is one of the most renowned artists from the mid-twentieth century. Throughout her prolific career, Saint Phalle created a complex body of work in various media which was deeply embedded with socio-political issues. With themes ranging from joyful to profound to intellectual, the paradoxal nature of her work has yet to be fully explored. She was one of the first women to receive international acclaim and recognition during her lifetime, as well as successfully create a public persona. Similar to Warhol, Saint Phalle was able to use the media to skillfully guide the reception of her work

Cheval et la Mariée, 1963, 235 x 300 x 120 cm, tissu, jouets, objets divers, grillage, Sprengel Museum, Hanovre, © BPK, Berlin, dist. Rmn-Grand Palais / Michael Herling / Aline Gwose

Cheval et la Mariée, 1963, 235 x 300 x 120 cm, tissu, jouets, objets divers, grillage, Sprengel Museum, Hanovre, © BPK, Berlin, dist. Rmn-Grand Palais / Michael Herling / Aline Gwose


W
ithout any formal art training, Niki de Saint Phalle took her inspiration from Gaudi, Dubuffet and Pollock to invent, in the late 1950s, a singular world independent of any trend or art movement. Her entire career is sublimated by great themes and myths, which later articulated her entire oeuvre. The joyous, colourful side of her work is well known but its violence, commitment and radical stands have been forgotten. And this is equally true of her audacious performances, the political and feminist content of her work and her ambitious public sculptures.

Dolorès, 1968-1995, 550 cm, polyester peint sur grillage, Sprengel Museum, Hanovre,© 2014 Niki Charitable Art Foundation, All rights reserved. Donation Niki de Saint Phalle -

Dolorès, 1968-1995, 550 cm, polyester peint sur grillage, Sprengel Museum, Hanovre,© 2014 Niki Charitable Art Foundation, All rights reserved. Donation Niki de Saint Phalle -


T
his retrospective, the first major exhibition devoted to Niki de Saint Phalle in twenty years, presents a multifaceted artist, at once a painter, assembly artist, sculptor, printmaker, performer and experimental filmmaker, and takes a profoundly new look at her work. Over 200 works and archives, many unpublished, are set out in 2,000 square metres, organised by chronology and theme, and punctuated by screens showing the artist talking about her work. Models of architectural projects and a sculpture-fountain (Snake’s Tree) outside the Grand Palais will give visitors an idea of the scope and diversity of her public work

Musee du Grand Palais


David Bowie Is – Chicago – Illinois

Album cover shoot for Aladdin Sane, 1973 - Design: Brian Duffy and Celia Philo; make up: Pierre La Roche - Photo: Duffy © Duffy Archive & The David Bowie Archive

Album cover shoot for Aladdin Sane, 1973 – Design: Brian Duffy and Celia Philo; make up: Pierre La Roche – Photo: Duffy © Duffy Archive & The David Bowie Archive


September 23, 2014–January 4, 2015 – Museum of Contemporary Art

David Bowie Is presents the first retrospective of the extraordinary career of David Bowie—one of the most pioneering and influential performers of our time. The exhibition brings together more than 300 objects, including handwritten lyrics, original costumes, photography, set designs, album artwork, and rare performance material from the past five decades are brought together from the David Bowie Archive for the first time.

life-on-mars

Organized chronologically, David Bowie Is traces the artist’s evolution from his years as a teenager in the 1950s to the early 2000s when he retired from touring. On display are more than sixty stage costumes including the Ziggy Stardust bodysuits (1972), designed by Freddie Burretti; Kansai Yamamoto’s flamboyant creations for the Aladdin Sane tour (1973); and the Union Jack coat designed by Bowie and Alexander McQueen for the Earthling album cover (1997).
longside such prominent examples are more personal items such as never-before-seen storyboards, handwritten set lists and lyrics, and some of Bowie’s own sketches, musical scores, and diary entries, which help reveal the evolution of his creative ideas. His chameleonic character transformations throughout the years are central to his contribution to contemporary culture.

Museum of Contemporary Art Chigago


Beyond Pop Art: A Tom Wesselmann Retrospective – Denver – Colorado

Tom Wesselmann (American, b.1931, d.2004), Still Life #60, 1973.Oil on canvas; 122 1/4 x 333 x 86 1/2 in. Lent by Claire Wesselmann. © Estate of Tom Wesselmann/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY, Photo Credit: Jeffrey Sturges.

Tom Wesselmann (American, b.1931, d.2004), Still Life #60, 1973.Oil on canvas; 122 1/4 x 333 x 86 1/2 in. Lent by Claire Wesselmann. © Estate of Tom Wesselmann/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY, Photo Credit: Jeffrey Sturges.


July 13, 2014 – September 14, 2014 – Denver Art Museum

Beyond Pop Art: A Tom Wesselmann Retrospective features the work of painter Tom Wesselmann, who is widely regarded as one of the leading figures of American pop art.

Tom Wesselmann (American, b.1931, d.2004), Smoker, 1 (Mouth, 12), 1967. Oil on canvas, in two parts; Overall 9' 7/8" x 7' 1" (276.6 x 216 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Susan Morse Hilles Fund, 1968. © Estate of Tom Wesselmann/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY, Photo Credit: Jeffrey Sturges.

Tom Wesselmann (American, b.1931, d.2004), Smoker, 1 (Mouth, 12), 1967. Oil on canvas, in two parts; Overall 9′ 7/8″ x 7′ 1″ (276.6 x 216 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Susan Morse Hilles Fund, 1968. © Estate of Tom Wesselmann/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY, Photo Credit: Jeffrey Sturges.


O
rganized chronologically, this exhibition follows the development of Wesselmann’s work, series by series, from the earliest abstract collages to his well-known series, Great American Nude, and still lifes of his pop period to the cut-steel drawings and Sunset Nudes of his late work.

Tom Wesselmann (American, b.1931, d.2004), Landscape #5, 1965. Oil on canvas and Liquitex and collage on canvas; 84 x 144 1/2 x 18 in. Lent by Claire Wesselmann. © Estate of Tom Wesselmann/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY, Photo Credit: Jeffrey Sturges.

Tom Wesselmann (American, b.1931, d.2004), Landscape #5, 1965. Oil on canvas and Liquitex and collage on canvas; 84 x 144 1/2 x 18 in. Lent by Claire Wesselmann. © Estate of Tom Wesselmann/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY, Photo Credit: Jeffrey Sturges.


B
eyond Pop Art features approximately 100 works, including the larger-than-life Still Life #60 (pictured above) and Screen Star.

Denver Art Museum


A Bunny Yeager Retrospective – Las Vegas – Nevada

bunny-yeager-camera

Until the 20th of July 2014 – Sin City Gallery
“Bunny’s Bombshells” – Anyone who is into the vintage pinup lifestyle or at least appreciates the art has probably heard of Bunny Yeager, the 1950s  pinup photographer who helped make Bettie Page famous.  Born Linnea Eleanor Yeager on March 13, 1929, she passed away Sunday, May 25th 2014, but was still shooting photos in her Miami studio and gallery right up to the end!

24. Silver Gelatin Print 20x24 Ed. of 5 or 16x20 Ed. of 10 (Model Bettie Page)

24. Silver Gelatin Print 20×24 Ed. of 5 or 16×20 Ed. of 10 (Model Bettie Page)


A
dmirers of retro aesthetics are in for a treat, as legendary “pin–up girl” photographer Bunny Yeager has an exhibition in Las Vegas at the Sin City Gallery. The exhibition, titled “Bunny’s Bombshells,”  This is a rare opportunity to see and enjoy the golden age of this visual style.

Yeager started out as model in the 1950’s, and only picked up a camera to take her own portfolio shots. She quickly found a calling: as talented as she was before the camera, Yeager proved to be a genius behind it.

Silver Gelatin Print 20x24 Ed. of 5 or 16x20 Ed. of 10 (Bunny Yeager)

Silver Gelatin Print 20×24 Ed. of 5 or 16×20 Ed. of 10 (Bunny Yeager)


Y
eager brought a unique point of view to a formerly male-dominated craft. Beauty, lightness and spontaneity became the trademark in the pictures of Bunny’s girls. She discovered Bettie Page and made her the icon of the 1950’s she remains today, and was the first woman to have shot for Playboy, and has created some of the magazine’s most emblematic covers.

33. Silver Gelatin Print 20x24 Ed. of 5 or 16x20 Ed. of 10 (Model Bettie Page)

33. Silver Gelatin Print 20×24 Ed. of 5 or 16×20 Ed. of 10 (Model Bettie Page)

103. Silver Gelatin Print 20x24 Ed. of 5 or 16x20 Ed. of 10 (Model Bettie Page)

103. Silver Gelatin Print 20×24 Ed. of 5 or 16×20 Ed. of 10 (Model Bettie Page)


T
he iconic photos of Bettie Page in the leopard print bikini that Bunny designed are some of the most famous pinup photos of all time!

bunny-and-bettie

“Almost all of the girls I asked easily agreed to pose for me, because they knew I wasn’t going to flirt with them like the men photographers did,” recalls Yeager.

Sin City Gallery


Veronese: Magnificence in Renaissance Venice – London – UK

Paolo Veronese (1528-1588) 'The Adoration of the Kings', 1573 Oil on canvas. 355.6 x 320 cm © The National Gallery, London

Paolo Veronese (1528-1588) ‘The Adoration of the Kings’, 1573 – Oil on canvas. 355.6 x 320 cm © The National Gallery, London


From 19 March to 15 June 2014 – The National Gallery

The National Gallery began with a unique asset when it worked on the project of a retrospective of Veronese, since it owns ten paintings by the Venetian master, among them The Family of Darius before Alexander or Adoration of the Magi). But they had to group together the remaining 40 works of art, and we know how museums hesitate to lend their works. While it was unconceivable to move Wedding at Cana from the Louvre, the frescoes of the palace of the Doges or from the church of the Frari, but what is brought together in London is nevertheless a first class choice …

Paolo Veronese (1528-1588), 'Perseus and Andromeda', 1575-80 - Oil on canvas. 260 x 211 cm - Rennes, Musée des Beaux-Arts

Paolo Veronese (1528-1588), ‘Perseus and Andromeda’, 1575-80 – Oil on canvas. 260 x 211 cm – Rennes, Musée des Beaux-Arts

We will admire works by Paolo Caliari (1528-1588) –his real name, the great rival of Tintoretto- such as the Mystical Marriage of Saint Catherine (Accademia, Venice), the Bella Nani from the Louvre and two portraits of men, from Palazzo Pitti and the Getty Center. The works of so famous an artist have been scat tered all over the globe and re-encounters can be surprising. One for example, is the one between two panels of an altarpiece from the little town of San Benedetto Po, separated since the 18th century that will once again live side by side, for a short period.

The National Gallery


Turner and the Sea – London – United Kingdom

J.M.William Turner - Staffa, Fingal's Cave - 122 x 91.5 cm - oil on canvas 1832 - Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut, USA

J.M.William Turner – Staffa, Fingal’s Cave – 122 x 91.5 cm – oil on canvas 1832 – Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut, USA


From 22 November 2013 to 21 April 2014 – National Maritime Museum

According to the legend Turner asked to be tied to the mast of his ship. Not to imitate Ulysses and resist the call of the mermaids, but rather to be able to closely observe a storm … This anecdote, whether it is apocryphal or not, only confirms the close relationship Turner (1775-1851) had with the sea. The English painter chose it as his main subject in half of his paintings, ranging from traditional seascapes to pre-Impressionist renderings. It is therefore no surprise both seasoned sea-dogs and armchair aesthetes have been awaiting this retrospective for a long time. It groups together pieces brought in from abroad, such as his Whale ship from the Metropolitan Museum in New York or his The wreck of a transport ship at the foundation Calouste Gulbenkian foundation in Lisbon.

J.M.William Turner - The Battle of Trafalgar, 21 October 1805 - National Maritime Museum

J.M.William Turner – The Battle of Trafalgar, 21 October 1805 – National Maritime Museum

This is also an opportunity for visitors to see one of his masterpieces, his version of the battle of Trafalgar. The nearly 4-meter long painting, the only royal commission the painter ever received throughout his career, was greatly criticized for its lack of veracity by those who lived the event.

National Maritime Museum


  • Follow International Art News

  • Categories

  • Archives

  • Copyright © 1999-2012 International Art News. All rights reserved.
    iDream theme by Templates Next | Powered by WordPress