J.M.William Turner - Staffa, Fingal's Cave - 122 x 91.5 cm - oil on canvas 1832 - Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut, USA

J.M.William Turner – Staffa, Fingal’s Cave – 122 x 91.5 cm – oil on canvas 1832 – Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut, USA


From 22 November 2013 to 21 April 2014 – National Maritime Museum

According to the legend Turner asked to be tied to the mast of his ship. Not to imitate Ulysses and resist the call of the mermaids, but rather to be able to closely observe a storm … This anecdote, whether it is apocryphal or not, only confirms the close relationship Turner (1775-1851) had with the sea. The English painter chose it as his main subject in half of his paintings, ranging from traditional seascapes to pre-Impressionist renderings. It is therefore no surprise both seasoned sea-dogs and armchair aesthetes have been awaiting this retrospective for a long time. It groups together pieces brought in from abroad, such as his Whale ship from the Metropolitan Museum in New York or his The wreck of a transport ship at the foundation Calouste Gulbenkian foundation in Lisbon.

J.M.William Turner - The Battle of Trafalgar, 21 October 1805 - National Maritime Museum

J.M.William Turner – The Battle of Trafalgar, 21 October 1805 – National Maritime Museum

This is also an opportunity for visitors to see one of his masterpieces, his version of the battle of Trafalgar. The nearly 4-meter long painting, the only royal commission the painter ever received throughout his career, was greatly criticized for its lack of veracity by those who lived the event.

National Maritime Museum