Vera Klute - Its coming out of my ears - fountain, plaster, pump, bucket, water, dimensions variable, 2011


From 7 May 2012 until 19 June 2012 – Butler Gallery – The Castle

The Butler Gallery reads like a latrine in the  context of Vera Klute’s work––especially considering the artist’s ‘pissing ear’ work at the far end of the Kilkenny art space entitled It’ s coming out of my ears. The grey tiled floor and series of ‘alcove galleries’ force the viewer to walk to the right and look to the left. Unavoidably, the art works are given a serial and segregated presentation, while the artist tries to form a cohesive hole. Saying that, the staccato architecture is perfect for Klute’s work, which presents the body as a series of disconnected bit-parts; divine and maybe not so divine.

Vera Klute - Its coming out of my ears (detail), - fountain, plaster, pump, bucket, water, dimensions variable, 2011


Y
ou almost have to break down her art practice into genus and species: drawings and paintings are also present. In each disconnected space of the gallery the viewer is presented with a limb, limbs or internal organs, that are being manipulated by kinetic or digital means. A series of large drawings hang volutes-like from the ceiling with a top heavy composition of what can only be read as cherubim. However, the composition crops the heads of the figures, suggesting decapitation or Icarian hubris. The latter seems to fit Klute’s playful fabrications, which suggest the daring of science and technology to play God through cybernetic experiments…(James Merrigan)

Vera Klute - Its coming out of my ears (detail), - fountain, plaster, pump, bucket, water, dimensions variable, 2011


Fr
om oil paintings of dead creatures to a pair of mechanical spoon-wielding hands, Vera Klute also does film installations and precise pencil drawings, as in Public Pool, which hangs ceiling-to-floor to give an underwater view of headless bodies in bathing suits, arms and legs flailing.

German-born, Dublin-based Klute makes art that is often uncanny and often absurd, driven by a dispassionate fascination with how humans function.
Klute consistently jolts viewers out of any sense of certainty about the nature of things with a show that is part science experiment, part psychological challenge. It deliberately raises more questions than it answers, which is just one of the reasons it works.

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