Paolo Veronese (1528-1588) 'The Adoration of the Kings', 1573 Oil on canvas. 355.6 x 320 cm © The National Gallery, London

Paolo Veronese (1528-1588) ‘The Adoration of the Kings’, 1573 – Oil on canvas. 355.6 x 320 cm © The National Gallery, London


From 19 March to 15 June 2014 – The National Gallery

The National Gallery began with a unique asset when it worked on the project of a retrospective of Veronese, since it owns ten paintings by the Venetian master, among them The Family of Darius before Alexander or Adoration of the Magi). But they had to group together the remaining 40 works of art, and we know how museums hesitate to lend their works. While it was unconceivable to move Wedding at Cana from the Louvre, the frescoes of the palace of the Doges or from the church of the Frari, but what is brought together in London is nevertheless a first class choice …

Paolo Veronese (1528-1588), 'Perseus and Andromeda', 1575-80 - Oil on canvas. 260 x 211 cm - Rennes, Musée des Beaux-Arts

Paolo Veronese (1528-1588), ‘Perseus and Andromeda’, 1575-80 – Oil on canvas. 260 x 211 cm – Rennes, Musée des Beaux-Arts

We will admire works by Paolo Caliari (1528-1588) –his real name, the great rival of Tintoretto- such as the Mystical Marriage of Saint Catherine (Accademia, Venice), the Bella Nani from the Louvre and two portraits of men, from Palazzo Pitti and the Getty Center. The works of so famous an artist have been scat tered all over the globe and re-encounters can be surprising. One for example, is the one between two panels of an altarpiece from the little town of San Benedetto Po, separated since the 18th century that will once again live side by side, for a short period.

The National Gallery